RECOGNISE HEALTHY BODY SYSTEMS ASSESSMENT

HLTAAP001 RECOGNISE HEALTHY BODY SYSTEMS ASSESSMENT

ASSESSMENT INFORMATION for students

Throughout your training we are committed to your learning by providing a training and assessment framework that ensures the knowledge gained through training is translated into practical on the job improvements.

You are going to be assessed for:

Your skills and knowledge using written and observation activities that apply to your workplace.

Your ability to apply your learning.

Your ability to recognise common principles and actively use these on the job.

All of your assessment and training is provided as a positive learning tool. Your assessor will guide your learning and provide feedback on your responses to the assessment materials until you have been deemed competent in this unit.

How you will be assessed

The process we follow is known as competency-based assessment. This means that evidence of your current skills and knowledge will be measured against national standards of best practice, not against the learning you have undertaken either recently or in the past. Some of the assessment will be concerned with how you apply your skills and knowledge in your workplace, and some in the training room as required by each unit.

The assessment tasks have been designed to enable you to demonstrate the required skills and knowledge and produce the critical evidence to successfully demonstrate competency at the required standard.

Your assessor will ensure that you are ready for assessment and will explain the assessment process. Your assessment tasks will outline the evidence to be collected and how it will be collected, for example; a written activity, case study, or demonstration and observation.

The assessor will also have determined if you have any special needs to be considered during assessment. Changes can be made to the way assessment is undertaken to account for special needs and this is called making Reasonable Adjustment.

 

What happens if your result is ‘Not Yet Competent’ for one or more assessment tasks?

Our assessment process is designed to answer the question “has the desired learning outcome been achieved yet?” If the answer is “Not yet”, then we work with you to see how we can get there.

In the case that one or more of your assessments has been marked ‘NYC’, your trainer will provide you with the necessary feedback and guidance, in order for you to resubmit your responses.

 

What if you disagree on the assessment outcome?

You can appeal against a decision made in regards to your assessment. An appeal should only be made if you have been assessed as ‘Not Yet Competent’ against a specific unit and you feel you have sufficient grounds to believe that you are entitled to be assessed as competent. You must be able to adequately demonstrate that you have the skills and experience to be able to meet the requirements of units you are appealing the assessment of.

Your trainer will outline the appeals process, which is available to the student. You can request a form to make an appeal and submit it to your trainer, the course coordinator, or the administration officer. The RTO will examine the appeal and you will be advised of the outcome within 14 days. Any additional information you wish to provide may be attached to the appeal form.

 

What if I believe I am already competent before training?

If you believe you already have the knowledge and skills to be able to demonstrate competence in this unit, speak with your trainer, as you may be able to apply for Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL).

 

Assessor Responsibilities

Assessors need to be aware of their responsibilities and carry them out appropriately. To do this they need to:

Ensure that participants are assessed fairly based on the outcome of the language, literacy and numeracy review completed at enrolment.

Ensure that all documentation is signed by the student, trainer, workplace supervisor and assessor when units and certificates are complete, to ensure that there is no follow-up required from an administration perspective.

Ensure that their own qualifications are current.

When required, request the manager or supervisor to determine that the student is ‘satisfactorily’ demonstrating the requirements for each unit. ‘Satisfactorily’ means consistently meeting the standard expected from an experienced operator.

When required, ensure supervisors and students sign off on third party assessment forms or third party report.

Follow the recommendations from moderation and validation meetings.

How should I format my assessments?

Your assessments should be typed in a 11 or 12 size font for ease of reading. You must include a footer on each page with the student name, unit code and date. Your assessment needs to be submitted as a hardcopy or electronic copy as requested by your trainer.

 

How long should my answers be?

The length of your answers will be guided by the description in each assessment, for example:

Type of Answer Answer Guidelines

 

Short Answer 4 typed lines = 50 words, or

5 lines of handwritten text

Long Answer 8 typed lines = 100 words, or

10 lines of handwritten text = of a foolscap page

Brief Report 500 words = 1 page typed report, or

50 lines of handwritten text = 1foolscap handwritten pages

Mid Report 1,000 words = 2 page typed report

100 lines of handwritten text = 3 foolscap handwritten pages

Long Report 2,000 words = 4 page typed report

200 lines of handwritten text = 6 foolscap handwritten pages

 

How should I reference the sources of information I use in my assessments?

Include a reference list at the end of your work on a separate page. You should reference the sources you have used in your assessments in the Harvard Style. For example:

Website Name – Page or Document Name, Retrieved insert the date. Webpage link.

For a book: Author surname, author initial Year of publication, Title of book, Publisher, City, State

assessment guide

The following table shows you how to achieve a satisfactory result against the criteria for each type of assessment task.

Assessment Method Satisfactory Result Non-Satisfactory Result
You will receive an overall result of Competent or Not Yet Competent for the unit. The assessment process is made up of a number of assessment methods. You are required to achieve a satisfactory result in each of these to be deemed competent overall. Your assessment may include the following assessment types.
Questions All questions answered correctly Incorrect answers for one or more questions
  Answers address the question in full; referring to appropriate sources from your workbook and/or workplace Answers do not address the question in full. Does not refer to appropriate or correct sources.
Third Party Report Supervisor or manager observes work performance and confirms that you consistently meet the standards expected from an experienced operator Could not demonstrate consistency. Could not demonstrate the ability to achieve the required standard
Written Activity The assessor will mark the activity against the detailed guidelines/instructions Does not follow guidelines/instructions
  Attachments if requested are attached Requested supplementary items are not attached
  All requirements of the written activity are addressed/covered. Response does not address the requirements in full; is missing a response for one or more areas.
  Responses must refer to appropriate sources from your workbook and/or workplace One or more of the requirements are answered incorrectly.

Does not refer to or utilise appropriate or correct sources of information

Observation All elements, criteria, knowledge and performance evidence and critical aspects of evidence, are demonstrated at the appropriate AQF level Could not demonstrate elements, criteria, knowledge and performance evidence and/or critical aspects of evidence, at the appropriate AQF level
Case Study All comprehension questions answered correctly; demonstrating an application of knowledge of the topic case study. Lack of demonstrated comprehension of the underpinning knowledge (remove) required to complete the case study questions correctly. One or more questions are answered incorrectly.
  Answers address the question in full; referring to appropriate sources from your workbook and/or workplace Answers do not address the question in full; do not refer to appropriate sources.

 

Assessment cover sheet

Assessment Cover Sheet
Student’s name:  
Assessors Name:   Date:
Is the Student ready for assessment? Yes No
Has the assessment process been explained? Yes No
Does the Student understand which evidence is to be collected and how? Yes No
Have the Student’s rights and the appeal system been fully explained? Yes No
Have you discussed any special needs to be considered during assessment? Yes No
The following documents must be completed and attached
Written Activity Checklist

The student will complete the written activity provided to them by the assessor.

The Written Activity Checklist will be completed by the assessor.

S NYS
Observation / Demonstration

The student will demonstrate a range of skills and the assessor will observe where appropriate to the unit.

The Observation Checklist will be completed by the assessor.

S NYS
Questioning Checklist

The student will answer a range of questions either verbally or written.

The Questioning Checklist will be completed by the assessor.

S NYS
I agree to undertake assessment in the knowledge that information gathered will only be used for professional development purposes and can only be accessed by the RTO:
Overall Outcome Competent Not yet Competent
Student Signature: Date:
Assessor Signature: Date:

 

 

 

written activity

For this assessment, you will need to perform the following tasks. These tasks will need to be completed and submitted in a professional, word processed, format. Each task must be 500 words minimum in length.

1. List the major body systems and then, using the correct terminology; describe the normal structure, function and location and interrelationships of each of the major body systems. Also evaluate how the relationships between different body systems affect and support healthy functioning. This should include:

a. Body regulation including:

i. Maintenance of body temperature

ii. Fluid and electrolyte (including PH) balance

iii. Elimination of wastes from the body

iv. Maintenance of blood pressure

i. Maintenance of body temperature

Skin protects the body, helps to hold it together and helps regulate temperature – so too does the skeleton which contributes, along with muscles and ligaments, to movement and to the manufacture of the blood cells essential for life. The cardiovascular system includes the heart, blood vessels that run through the body and the blood. This system also maintains body temperature. Blood vessels help maintain a stable body temperature by controlling the blood flow to the surface of the skin. Blood vessels near the skin’s surface open during times of overheating to allow hot blood to dump its heat into the body’s surroundings. In the case of hypothermia, these blood vessels constrict to keep blood flowing only to vital organs in the body’s core.

 

 

b. Protection from infection

The immune system is a network of cells, tissues and organs that work together to attack any pathogens that try to enter your body. The human body is a perfect host for bacteria, parasites and fungi, which cause infection. If any of these organisms gain entry to the body, the immune system works to destroy them and rid your body of illness. Personal health depends partially on the active, passive, and assisted cues people observe and adopt about their own health.

These include personal actions for preventing or minimizing the effects of a disease, usually a chronic condition, through integrative care. They also include personal hygiene practices to prevent infection and illness, such as bathing and washing hands with soap; brushing and flossing teeth; storing, preparing and handling food safely; and many others.

This means washing your hands, especially, but also your body. It means being careful not to cough or sneeze on others, cleaning things that you touch if you are unwell, putting items such as tissues (that may have germs) into a bin and using protection (like gloves or condoms) when you might be at risk of catching an infection.

Most infections, especially colds and gastroenteritis, are caught when we put our unwashed hands, which have germs on them, to our mouth. Some infections are caught when other people’s dirty hands touch the food we eat. Hands and wrists should be washed with clean soap and water, using a brush if your fingernails are dirty. Dry your hands with something clean, such as paper towels or hot air dryers. You should always wash hands:

After using the toilet

 Before making or eating food

 After handling dogs or other animals

 If you have been around someone who is coughing or has a cold.

 

c. Physical activity – active and passive

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HLTAAP001 Recognise healthy body systems Version 1.1

Course code and name

TOPIC 2 – RECOGNISE AND PROMOTE WAYS TO SUPPORT HEALTHY FUNCTIONING OF THE BODY

REVIEW FACTORS THAT CONTRIBUTE TO MAINTENANCE OF A HEALTHY BODY

Achieving and maintaining health is an ongoing process, shaped by both the evolution of health care knowledge and practices as well as personal strategies and organized interventions for staying healthy known as Lifestyle Management.39

PERSONAL HEALTH

Personal health depends partially on the active, passive, and assisted cues people observe and adopt about their own health. These include personal actions for preventing or minimizing the effects of a disease, usually a chronic condition, through integrative care. They also include personal hygiene practices to prevent infection and illness, such as bathing and washing hands with soap; brushing and flossing teeth; storing, preparing and handling food safely; and many others.

The information gleaned from personal observations of daily living – such as about sleep patterns, exercise behaviour, nutritional intake, and environmental features – may be used to inform personal decisions and actions (e.g., “I feel tired in the morning so I am going to try sleeping on a different pillow”), as well as clinical decisions and treatment plans (e.g., a patient who notices his or her shoes are tighter than usual may be having exacerbation of left-sided heart failure, and may require diuretic medication to reduce fluid overload).

Personal health also depends partially on the social structure of a person’s life. The maintenance of strong social relationships, volunteering, and other social activities have been linked to positive mental health and even increased longevity. One American study among seniors over age 70, found that frequent volunteering was associated with reduced risk of dying compared with older persons who did not volunteer, regardless of physical health status. Another study from Singapore reported that volunteering retirees had significantly better cognitive performance scores, fewer depressive symptoms, and better mental well-being and life satisfaction than non-volunteering retirees.

Prolonged psychological stress may negatively impact health, and has been cited as a factor in cognitive impairment with aging, depressive illness, and expression of disease. Stress management is the application of methods to either reduce stress or increase tolerance to stress. Relaxation techniques are physical methods used to relieve stress.

39 http://healthiswealthworld.blogspot.com.au/p/role-of-science-in-health.html

 

 

2. Create a “Healthy Body Maintenance” fact sheet or handout that would be appropriate to put in the waiting room at a local health service. This fact sheet/handout should be a minimum single sided, or maximum a double sided A4 information sheet. It should include information on:

a. Body regulation

Body regulation including:

 Maintenance of body temperature:

Regulation: The cardiovascular system is instrumental in the body’s ability to maintain homeostatic control of several internal conditions. Blood vessels help maintain a stable body temperature by controlling the blood flow to the surface of the skin. Blood vessels near the skin’s surface open during times of overheating to allow hot blood to dump its heat into the body’s surroundings. In the case of hypothermia, these blood vessels constrict to keep blood flowing only to vital organs in the body’s core.

 Fluid and electrolyte (including PH) balance:

Blood also helps balance the body’s pH due to the presence of bicarbonate ions, which act as a buffer solution. Finally, the albumins in blood plasma help to balance the osmotic concentration of the body’s cells by maintaining an isotonic environment

 Elimination of wastes from the body:

The digestive system is responsible for transforming food into energy. The food enters the digestive system; absorption takes place, and the food is transformed into enzymes, glucose and nutrients that the body uses as energy. The excretory system includes the kidneys, which filter wastes and purify the blood. This waste is transformed into urine and flows down two tubes, called ureters, which deliver the urine to the bladder. The urinary bladder is a large structure, similar to a sack, which collects the urine and then releases when full. The urine travels out of the body through a hole called the urethra.

 Maintenance of blood pressure:

 

 

b. Protection from infection

Good personal hygiene one of the most effective ways we have to protect ourselves and others from illness is good personal hygiene. This means washing your hands, especially, but also your body. It means being careful not to cough or sneeze on others, cleaning things that you touch if you are unwell, putting items such as tissues (that may have germs) into a bin and using protection (like gloves or condoms) when you might be at risk of catching an infection. Personal hygiene, such as bathing, is very much dependent on the culture in which you live. In some cultures, it is expected that you will wash your body at least every day and use deodorants to stop body smells. Other cultures have different expectations

Most infections, especially colds and gastroenteritis, are caught when we put our unwashed hands, which have germs on them, to our mouth. Some infections are caught when other people’s dirty hands touch the food we eat. Hands and wrists should be washed with clean soap and water, using a brush if your fingernails are dirty. Dry your hands with something clean, such as paper towels or hot air dryers. You should always wash your hands:

 After using the toilet

 Before making or eating food

 After handling dogs or other animals

 If you have been around someone who is coughing or has a cold

Personal health depends partially on the active, passive, and assisted cues people observe and adopt about their own health. These include personal actions for preventing or minimizing the effects of a disease, usually a chronic condition, through integrative care. They also include personal hygiene practices to prevent infection and illness, such as bathing and washing hands with soap; brushing and flossing teeth; storing, preparing and handling food safely; and many others.

 

c. Active and passive exercise (the benefits of both)

‘Active exercise’ is a term commonly used by medical, rehabilitation and fitness centres. ‘Exercise’ is that which an individual does using one’s own strength or energy. Active exercises involve conditioning, strengthening, flexibility and functional training. Passive range of motion exercises help keep a person’s joints flexible. Range of motion is how far the person’s joints can be moved in different directions. The exercises help you move all the person’s joints through their full range of motion. Passive exercise: Movement of the body, usually of the limbs, without effort by the patient. The patient is passive. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Range_of_motion

Passive exercises are also known as passive range of motion (ROM) exercises; and your range of motion includes how far you can move your joints in different directions. These exercises are considered passive because you don’t exert any effort. Instead, someone helps you move your muscles and joints through their full range of motion for you.

Active exercises involve your physical effort exerted into muscular activity. These exercises can include active range of motion, like self-stretching, or general stroke rehabilitation exercises where you move your muscles through therapeutic movements. As long as you’re doing the exercises yourself, it’s active exercise.

 

During stroke recovery, active rehab exercises help strengthen the neural pathways in your brain that enable you to perform the movement.

https://www.flintrehab.com/2015/active-vs-passive-exercises-during-rehab/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

written/verbal QUESTIONS

The following questions may be answered verbally with your assessor or you may write down your answers. Please discuss this with your assessor before you commence. These answers should be written as a brief report of 500 words = 1 page typed report, or 50 lines of handwritten text = 11⁄2 foolscap handwritten pages.

Your assessor will take down dot points as a minimum if you choose to answer them verbally.

Answer the following questions either verbally with your assessor or in writing.

1. Why is it necessary for health workers to use and understand accepted health terminology to describe the normal structure, function and location of the major body systems?

As health workers you need to be able to use accepted terminology for several reasons:

 Nurses, doctors, and pharmacists went to different schools and need to be able to effectively communicate with each other without ambiguity and confusion

 Imprecise terminology can lead to confusion or incorrect assumptions. Many specialists and members of the health care team will process the paperwork of a single patient during a single hospital stay. It is imperative that they all understand what the true situation is.

 Some terms are simply not acceptable anymore. For example, it is not correct to refer to someone as “mentally retarded” anymore. It is not acceptable to refer to homosexuality as a “disease” anymore. This has important implications for patient perceptions and treatment options.

As health care workers, you work to improve, support or benefit the physical and psychological wellbeing of the clients you work for and meet their needs.

Health care workers can, therefore, be:

 Nurses

 Nutritionists or dietitians

 Community service workers

 Medical practitioners/ advisers

 Leisure and recreational activity providers

 Councilors

 Psychologists

 Therapists

 Physical trainers

They might work in the following fields:

 Disability

 Ageing

 Alcohol and other drugs

 Education

 Palliative care

 Fitness

 Leisure and recreation

 Therapy service areas, e.g., physiotherapy, podiatry, etc.

 Children’s services

 Youth services

In most roles it is necessary for the health care worker to have at least a rudimentary understanding of a range of medical and health terminology and an understanding of the problems or issues that can impact on people’s physical and psychological health. They should understand anatomy and physiology so they can recognise body systems and their components. This will aid in identifying healthy body systems and those systems that are not functioning well.

It is necessary that health workers have a basic understanding of the fundamental principles of maintaining a healthy body, because by knowing that, they will be able to continue working and at same time keep a healthy body throughout their lives. But that basic information is valid not only to workers but also to everyone, from teens to elderly people

 

2. What are the 10 human body systems and what do they include?

Health care workers will need to have basic knowledge of the human body systems:

It is important that health care workers also have an understanding of the human bodies special senses, these are – smell, taste, vision, equilibrium and hearing.

 

 

3. What are 8 things that should be considered in maintaining a healthy body?

Health workers who provide advice and care for clients/ patients must have a clear understanding of what comprises a healthy body and of the measures that need to be taken to ensure that the body remains healthy. In essence, good health can be maintained through healthy eating, reasonable amounts and types of exercise, a good balance between work and recreation activities, moderation with regard to drinking alcohol, not smoking cigarettes or consuming illicit drugs, participation in appropriate leisure activities, maintaining good psychological health, managing effective hygiene and cleanliness

 

4. What are the 3 functions of the cardiovascular system?

The cardiovascular system’s central organ is the heart, which pumps blood to the different parts of your body. The blood travels from the heart to the lungs, where the respiratory system supplies the blood with oxygen. You inhale air through your nose or mouth; it passes through your pharynx, larynx, trachea and finally to the lungs, where it diffuses in the blood through the alveoli. The cardiovascular system includes the heart, blood vessels that run through the body and the blood. This system has many functions that include the removal of waste products, transport of nutrients, help fight against diseases, maintain body temperature and responsible for the circulation of the blood throughout the body. The cardiovascular systems stabilises the body and maintains health, it is the most system in the body, and it keeps the rest of the systems running smoothly

 

5. Discuss four ways to keep healthy.

Exercise:

Hygiene:

Healthy eating

Psychological wellness:

 

 

6. How do the Skeletal, Muscular, Cardiovascular and Respiratory system co-operate to allow the body to function properly and enable movement?

All body systems work together in a delicate balance to maintain the body in optimal health. The Skeletal, Muscular, Cardiovascular and Respiratory system have their own job in the body however they co-operate together to allow the body to function properly and enable movement.

The Skeletal System provides support and creates a framework for the body, without the structure of bones our body would collapse. The bones protect internal organs of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems as well as fragile body tissues. The Respiratory system benefits bone marrow which produces red blood cells for the body.

The muscular system has many different functions; the system protects the body’s internal organs, maintains posture and ensures the production of heat. The muscles provide the forces that enable the body to move. The skeletal system provides a bone structure for the muscles to attach tendons and ligaments, allowing movement of the body.

The cardiovascular system includes the heart, blood vessels that run through the body and the blood. This system has many functions that include the removal of waste products, transport of nutrients, help fight against diseases, maintain body temperature and responsible for the circulation of the blood throughout the body. The cardiovascular systems stabilise the body and maintains health, it is the most system in the body, and it keeps the rest of the systems running smoothly.

Although each body system has its own function, they all interrelate with each other and help sustain a healthy body.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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