identify problems of vagueness

identify problems of vagueness

Name: Don’t Forget

Date:

 

 

UNIT 3 TEST

 

(The directions and procedures for this test are the same as for the previous Unit test.)

Save this test on your computer, and complete the questions by marking correct answers with the “text color” function in WORD (  ) located on the “home” toolbar. Please attach your completed test to the assignment submission page.

 

 

Section I

 

 

Please identify problems of vagueness, overgenerality and ambiguity (double meaning) in the following passages. Then explain briefly how/why the passage exemplifies that problem. (Some examples may contain more than one problem.)

 

 

 

1. Who was Hitler? He was an Austrian.

 

__vague

__overgeneral

__ambiguous

 

Explanation:

 

 

2. The judge sanctioned the firm’s criminal conduct.

 

__vague

__overgeneral

__ambiguous

 

Explanation:

 

 

3. “Turn right here!”

 

__vague

__overgeneral

__ambiguous

 

Explanation:

 

 

 

4. (From a Student Code of Conduct– Sexual impropriety in the dorms after 6:00 pm is forbidden.

 

__vague

__overgeneral

__ambiguous

 

Explanation:

 

 

5. Did Donald win the election? Well, he did get quite a few votes!

 

__vague

__overgeneral

__ambiguous

 

Explanation:

 

 

6. How are Henry’s finances? Oh, he’s really quite well off!

 

__vague

__overgeneral

__ambiguous

 

 

7. Bertha Belch, as missionary from Africa, will be speaking tonight at the Calvary Chapel. Come and hear Bertha Belch all the way from Africa.

 

__vague

__overgeneral

__ambiguous

 

Explanation:

 

 

8. Lower Slobovia can’t be a very well-run country. I mean, it’s not particularly democratic!

[Careful: Think about the various aspects of these claims before answering.]

__vague

__overgeneral

__ambiguous

 

 

 

 

Section II Definitions

Please indicate whether the following are stipulative, persuasive, lexical or precising definitions.

 

 

 

 

9. Postmodern means a chaotic and confusing mishmash of images and references that leaves readers and viewers longing for the days of a good, well-told story.

 

__ stipulative

__ persuasive

__ lexical

__ précising

 

 

10. A triangle is a plane figure enclosed by 3 straight lines.

__ stipulative

__ persuasive

__ lexical

__ precising

 

 

11. An arid region, for purposes of this study, is any region that receives an average of less than 15 inches of rain per year

__ stipulative

__ persuasive

__ lexical

__ precising

 

 

14. A Blanker is someone who sends holiday cards without signatures or personalized messages

__ stipulative

__ persuasive

__ lexical

__ precising

 

 

15. Tragedy, in literary terms, means a serious drama that usually ends in disaster nd that focuses on a single character who experiences unexpected reversals in fat, often falling from a position of authority and power because of an unrecognized flaw or misguided action

 

__ stipulative

__ persuasive

__ lexical

__ précising

 

 

 

Section III. Strategies for Defining

Please indicate whether the following lexical definitions are ostensive definitions, enumerative definitions, definitions by subclass, etymological definitions, synonymous definitions, or definitions by genus and difference.

 

16. Rectangle means a geometrical figure consisting of four straight lines and four right angles.

 

__ostensive definition

__enumerative definition

__definition by subclass

__etymological definition

__synonymous definition

__definition by genus and difference.

 

 

 

17. Diurnal means once daily

 

__ostensive definition

__enumerative definition

__definition by subclass

__etymological definition

__synonymous definition

__definition by genus and difference.

 

 

18. Passion derives from the Greek pathos, meaning emotion.

 

__ostensive definition

__enumerative definition

__definition by subclass

__etymological definition

__synonymous definition

__definition by genus and difference.

 

 

19. “A golf club? That’s one of these things over there.

__ostensive definition

__enumerative definition

__definition by subclass

__etymological definition

__synonymous definition

__definition by genus and difference.

 

 

20. An actor is someone like Bruce Willis or Tom Cruise, or even John Wayne.

 

__ostensive definition

__enumerative definition

__definition by subclass

__etymological definition

__synonymous definition

__definition by genus and difference.

 

 

 

Section IV. Rules for Evaluating Lexical Definitions

Each of the following lexical definitions is defective in some way. Determine whether the definition is too broad, too narrow, lacking in context, figurative, slanted, obscure, circular, or fails to capture the essential meaning of the word.

 

21. Bicycle means a two-wheeled vehicle.

__too broad

__too narrow

__lacking in context

__figurative

__slanted

__obscure

__circular

__fails to capture the essential meaning

 

 

22. Eagle means a score of two below par on any hole

__too broad

__too narrow

__lacking in context

__figurative

__slanted

__obscure

__circular

__fails to capture the essential meaning

 

 

23. Vegetarian means an animal-loving nut who refuses to eat real

__too broad

__too narrow

__lacking in context

__figurative

__slanted

__obscure

__circular

__fails to capture the essential meaning

 

 

24 Aesthetics is that branch of philosophy that examines aesthetic properties.

 

__too broad

__too narrow

__lacking in context

__figurative

__slanted

__obscure

__circular

__fails to capture the essential meaning

 

 

25. School vouchers are government-issued certificates, providing a credit against future educational expenses, that will introduce badly-needed competition into America’s calcified public education system and provide equal educational opportunities for all.

 

__too broad

__too narrow

__lacking in context

__figurative

__slanted

__obscure

__circular

__fails to capture the essential meaning

 

 

 

 

Section V. Euphemisms and Dysphemisms

Please provide one or more euphemisms (positive designations) and dysphemisms (negative designations) for the following:

 

(Hint: You might find a Thesaurus useful for answering these questions.)

 

Example:

 

Lawyer:

Euphemism: e.g.: advocate, attorney, councilor

Dysphemism: e.g.: mouthpiece, shyster, ambulance chaser

 

 

26: an untruth

Euphemism:

Dysphemism:

 

 

27. Girlfriend

Euphemism:

Dysphemism:

 

Please describe the following events/states of affairs utilizing euphemisms/dysphemisms to present a positive or negative slant:

 

Example:

Sarah Jones today informed Rodney Harris that she would not marry him after all, considering what she had learned of his character.

Positive: e.g.: The engagement of Sarah Jones and Rodney Harris was dissolved today, due to basic character differences between them.

Negative: e.g.: Sarah Jones today showed Rodney Harris the door after she finally caught on to what a miserable scumbag he is.

 

 

28. The Governor today announced a 30% rise in tuition for all public institutions of higher learning.

 

Positive:

Negative:

 

 

29. Henry Whipple today received notice that he would no longer be employed by Seven-Eleven after the first of March.

 

Positive:

Negative:

 

30. American planes today bombed the capital of Syria, targeting military facilities and government offices.

 

Positive:

Negative:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unit 3 Test (150225) KEY 4

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