Group psychotherapy in women with a history of sexual abuse

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Word Count: 762 WK6AssignJonesIbrahimSApplyingCurrentLiteratureToClinicalPractice (3).pptx

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Applying Current Literature To Clinical Practice

SILIFAT JONES-IBRAHIM DR EZIRIM

NURS 6650: PSYCHOTHERAPY WITH GROUPS AND FAMILIES

OCTOBER 10TH 2020

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Overview of the article Authors used a combination of psychotherapy techniques including psychoeducation and behavioral method. A group of 47 women who were sexually abused in their childhood were the selected participants. Authors grouped participants in a set of 8-10 members of the five groups. For 12 weeks times,

participants were meeting weekly where each session lasted for 90 minutes with an agenda.

Authors utilized an eclectic method of group psychotherapy that combined well‐validated psychotherapy methods including cognitive behavioral therapy, interpersonal therapy, narrative therapy, psychoeducation and expressive techniques for trauma‐focused therapies. The researchers recruited forty‐seven women with a history of childhood and/or adulthood sexual abuse for weekly 12‐session group psychotherapy, with each session lasting 90 minutes (Sayın, Candansayar & Welkin, 2013). The participants were divided into five groups, with each consisting of 8–10 members. 2

Curative factors Instillation of hope

Universality

Imparting information

Cohesiveness

Sayın, Candansayar & Welkin (2013), stated that the installation and maintenance of hope is crucial to the success of psychotherapy, stating that hope required

t k th li t i th d th t f ith i th th ti h i ff ti Th t f i lit i l i t t ti f t f thi

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10/10/2020 Originality Report

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Source Matches (19)

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to keep the client in therapy and that faith in the therapeutic approach increases effectiveness. The concept of universality is also an important curative factor for this group. Stated that after hearing other group members share stories and concerns like their own, clients reported feeling more in touch with the world and feeling like they were not alone. Authors stated that building in a psychoeducational component that offers explicit instruction about the nature of the life situation and examining misconceptions and self-defeating responses is an important curative factor. It was also stated that an engaged, cohesive therapeutic relationship is necessary to achieve full therapeutic effect in all kinds of therapy (Sayın, Candansayar & Welkin, 2013).

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Study Outcomes

Article’s findings indicated that participant’s anxiety, depression, and symptoms of PTSD were significantly reduced by group psychotherapy. At the 6th session, the authors state it is the moment participants felt the effects of therapy which continued to six-month of follow-up. The most helpful therapeutic factors that the

participants pointed out were the universalism, cohesiveness, and existential.

Among the 47 women who applied for the study, 32 (68·1%) finished the whole group process, seven never attended group after being screened, and these

subjects were excluded from further statistical analysis. The remaining eight (17·0%) subjects were referred to as ‘dropouts’, because they attended at least one session but did not finish the whole process (Sayın, Candansayar & Welkin, 2013). 4

Exclusion criteria Participants below 16 years were excluded from the study. Declining to sign the informed consent. Individuals with psychotic problems.

Extreme homicidal thoughts Mental retardation. People abusing drugs and alcohol.

The exclusion criteria included being younger than 16 years of age, having a psychotic disorder, active alcohol or substance dependence, mental retardation,

severe suicidal thoughts and not signing the written informed consent form.

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Influence of Study Outcomes on Practice

The study showed that using different psychotherapy methods in healthcare can effectively improve patients with a history of trauma, antisocial behaviors, depression, and stigma associated feelings. Also, the study’s outcomes such as the psychotherapy treatment that was done on participants largely showed 67% of patients neither completed nor followed the PTSD criteria. I would therefore incorporate the use of various psychotherapy methods in group psychotherapy into

my practice as a PMHNP.

For this reason, this specific study cannot be generalized for clinical use, but the therapeutic approach discussed remains a valid therapeutic tool, as supported by other studies such as the multidimensional meta-analysis of psychotherapy for PTSD by (Sayın, Candansayar & Welkin, 2013).

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Impact of study limitations on usability of findings and outcomes

A small sample sizes. This is not a controlled study. One therapist in the group performed the treatment outcome ratings.

The small sample size of this study is not representative of all Turkish sexual abuse victims, as it includes only women living in the capital city of Turkey Since this

is not a controlled study, and the researchers did not compare the therapeutic effect of group psychotherapy to any other form of treatment or a waiting list Treatment outcome ratings performed by one of the therapists in the group may have created a bias (Sayın, Candansayar & Welkin, 2013). 7

References Sayın, A., Candansayar, S., & Welkin, L. (2013). Group psychotherapy in women with a history of sexual abuse: what did they find helpful?.

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Journal of Clinical Nursing, 22(23-24), 3249-3258. retrieved from:11

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Student paper

Applying Current Literature To Clinical Practice

Original source

Applying Current Literature to Clinical Practice

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PSYCHOTHERAPY WITH GROUPS AND FAMILIES

Original source

Psychotherapy With Groups and Families

 

 

10/10/2020 Originality Report

https://class.waldenu.edu/webapps/mdb-sa-BBLEARN/originalityReport/ultra?attemptId=9df73c8b-7ee6-4235-8f8d-a81a90b51dfe&course_id=_16728… 3/5

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statpearls 65%

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Student paper

Authors grouped participants in a set of 8-10 members of the five groups. For 12 weeks times, participants were meeting weekly where each session lasted for 90 minutes with an agenda. Authors utilized an eclectic method of group psychotherapy that combined well‐ validated psychotherapy methods including cognitive behavioral therapy, interpersonal therapy, narrative therapy, psychoeducation and expressive techniques for trauma‐focused therapies. The researchers recruited forty‐seven women with a history of childhood and/or adulthood sexual abuse for weekly 12‐session group psychotherapy, with each session lasting 90 minutes (Sayın, Candansayar & Welkin, 2013).

Original source

Participants were divided into five groups, each consisting of 8–10 members The participants met weekly for 12 weeks, and each session lasted 90‐ minutes, and had an agenda Sayın, Candansayar & Welkin (2013), utilized an eclectic method of group psychotherapy that combined well‐validated psychotherapy methods including cognitive behavioral therapy, interpersonal therapy, narrative therapy, psychoeducation and expressive techniques for trauma‐focused therapies The researchers recruited forty‐seven women with a history of childhood and/or adulthood sexual abuse for weekly 12‐session group psychotherapy, with each session lasting 90 minutes (Sayın, Candansayar & Welkin, 2013)

1

Student paper

The participants were divided into five groups, with each consisting of 8–10 members.

Original source

Participants were divided into five groups, each consisting of 8–10 members

3

Student paper

Curative factors Instillation of hope

Original source

Instillation of hope

1

Student paper

Sayın, Candansayar & Welkin (2013), stated that the installation and maintenance of hope is crucial to the success of psychotherapy, stating that hope required to keep the client in therapy and that faith in the therapeutic approach increases effectiveness. The concept of universality is also an important curative factor for this group. Stated that after hearing other group members share stories and concerns like their own, clients reported feeling more in touch with the world and feeling like they were not alone. Authors stated that building in a psychoeducational component that offers explicit instruction about the nature of the life situation and examining misconceptions and self-defeating responses is an important curative factor.

Original source

Yalom & Leszcz (2005), stated that the instillation and maintenance of hope is crucial to the success of psychotherapy, stating that hope required to keep the client in therapy and that faith in the therapeutic approach increases effectiveness The concept of universality is also an important curative factor for this group Stated that after hearing other group members share stories and concerns like their own, clients reported feeling more in touch with the world and feeling like they were not alone Yalom & Leszcz (2005), stated that building in a psychoeducational component that offers explicit instruction about the nature of the life situation and examining misconceptions and self-defeating responses is an important curative factor

1

Student paper

It was also stated that an engaged, cohesive therapeutic relationship is necessary to achieve full therapeutic effect in all kinds of therapy (Sayın, Candansayar & Welkin, 2013).

Original source

Yalom & Leszcz (2005), stated that an engaged, cohesive therapeutic relationship is necessary to achieve full therapeutic effect in all kinds of therapy

 

 

10/10/2020 Originality Report

https://class.waldenu.edu/webapps/mdb-sa-BBLEARN/originalityReport/ultra?attemptId=9df73c8b-7ee6-4235-8f8d-a81a90b51dfe&course_id=_16728… 4/5

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The most helpful therapeutic factors that the participants pointed out were the universalism, cohesiveness, and existential.

Original source

Group members rated existential factors, cohesiveness and universalism as the most helpful therapeutic factors

1

Student paper

Among the 47 women who applied for the study, 32 (68·1%) finished the whole group process, seven never attended group after being screened, and these subjects were excluded from further statistical analysis. The remaining eight (17·0%) subjects were referred to as ‘dropouts’, because they attended at least one session but did not finish the whole process (Sayın, Candansayar & Welkin, 2013).

Original source

Among the 47 women who applied for the study, 32 (68·1%) finished the whole group process, seven never attended group after being screened, and these subjects were excluded from further statistical analysis The remaining eight (17·0%) subjects were referred to as ‘dropouts’, because they attended at least one session but did not finish the whole process

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Student paper

Declining to sign the informed consent.

Original source

Refusal to sign informed consent

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Student paper

The exclusion criteria included being younger than 16 years of age, having a psychotic disorder, active alcohol or substance dependence, mental retardation, severe suicidal thoughts and not signing the written informed consent form.

Original source

The exclusion criteria included being younger than 16 years of age, having a psychotic disorder, active alcohol or substance dependence, mental retardation, severe suicidal thoughts and not signing the written informed consent form

1

Student paper

Influence of Study Outcomes on Practice

Original source

Influence of Study Outcomes on Practice

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Student paper

I would therefore incorporate the use of various psychotherapy methods in group psychotherapy into my practice as a PMHNP. For this reason, this specific study cannot be generalized for clinical use, but the therapeutic approach discussed remains a valid therapeutic tool, as supported by other studies such as the multidimensional meta-analysis of psychotherapy for PTSD by (Sayın, Candansayar & Welkin, 2013).

Original source

I would therefore incorporate the use of various psychotherapy methods in group psychotherapy into my practice as a PMHNP For this reason, this specific study cannot be generalized for clinical use, but the therapeutic approach discussed remains a valid therapeutic tool, as supported by other studies such as the multidimensional meta-analysis of psychotherapy for PTSD by Bradley, Greene, Russ, Dutra & Westen (2005)

 

 

10/10/2020 Originality Report

https://class.waldenu.edu/webapps/mdb-sa-BBLEARN/originalityReport/ultra?attemptId=9df73c8b-7ee6-4235-8f8d-a81a90b51dfe&course_id=_16728… 5/5

Student paper 88%

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Student paper 75%

Student paper 100%

embodiedphilosophy 100%

essaycops 100%

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Impact of study limitations on usability of findings and outcomes A small sample sizes. This is not a controlled study.

Original source

Impact of study limitations on usability of findings and outcomes A small sample size This is not a controlled study

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Student paper

One therapist in the group performed the treatment outcome ratings.

Original source

Only one therapists in the group performed the treatment outcome ratings

8

Student paper

The small sample size of this study is not representative of all Turkish sexual abuse victims, as it includes only women living in the capital city of Turkey Since this is not a controlled study, and the researchers did not compare the therapeutic effect of group psychotherapy to any other form of treatment or a waiting list Treatment outcome ratings performed by one of the therapists in the group may have created a bias (Sayın, Candansayar & Welkin, 2013).

Original source

The authors reports some major limititations within this study which includes a small sample size, not representing all Turkish sexual abuse victims, the study was not controlled, which means the therapeutic effect of group psychotherapy was not compared to any other form of treatment or a waiting list, and all the treatment outcome ratings were performed by one of the therapists in the group and that may have created a bias (Aslhan, Selçuk, & Leyla, 2013)

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Student paper

References Sayın, A., Candansayar, S., & Welkin, L.

Original source

References Sayın, A., Candansayar, S., & Welkin, L

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Student paper

Group psychotherapy in women with a history of sexual abuse: what did they find helpful?.

Original source

Group psychotherapy in women with a history of sexual abuse what did they find helpful

11

Student paper

Journal of Clinical Nursing, 22(23-24), 3249-3258.

Original source

Journal of Clinical Nursing, 22(23/24), 3249-3258

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