failure to consult

SELF-ASSESSMENT 2.6 ARE YOU INTROVERTED OR EXTRAVERTED? PURPOSE This self-assessment is designed to help you estimate the extent to which you are introverted or extraverted.

INSTRUCTIONS The statements in the scale below refer to personal characteristics that might or might not be char- acteristic of you. Mark the box indicating the extent to

IPlP Introversion – Extraversion Scale

which the statement accurately or inaccurately describes you. Then use the scoring key in Appendix B at the end of this book to calculate your results. This exercise should be completed alone so that you can assess yourself honestly without concerns of social comparison. Class discussion will focus on the meaning and implications of extraversion and introversion in organizations.

HOW ACCURATELY DOES EACH OF THE STATEMENTS LISTED VERY ACCURATE MODERATELY BELOW DESCRIBE YOU? DESCRIPTION OF ME ACCURATE

NEITHER ACCURATE NOR INACCURATE

MODERATELY INACCURATE

VERY INACCURATE DESCRIPTION OF ME

1. I feel comfortable 0 around people.

2. I make friends easily.

3. I keep in the background.

4. I don’t talk a lot.

5. I would describe my experiences as somewhat dull.

6. I know how to captivate ❑ ❑ ❑ people.

7. I don’t like to draw ❑ ❑ ❑ attention to myself.

8. I am the life of the party. ❑ ❑ ❑

9. I am skilled in handling ❑ ❑ ❑ social situations.

10. I have little to say. ❑ ❑ ❑

Source: Adapted from instruments described and/or presented in L. R. Goldberg, J. A. Johnson, H. W Eber, R. Hogan, M. C. Ashton, C. R. Cloninger, and H. C. Gough, “The International Personality Item Pool and the Future of Public-Domain Personality Measures:’ Journal of Research in Personality 40 (2006), pp. 84-96.

After reading this chapter go to www.mhhe.com/mcshane6e for more in-depth information and interactivities that correspond to the chapter.

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( 3 Perceiving Ourselves and Others in Organizations

/ learning objectives After reading this chapter, you should be able to:

LO1 Describe the elements of self- concept and explain how they affect an individual’s behavior and well-being.

LO2 Outline the perceptual process and discuss the effects of categorical thinking and mental models in that process.

LO3 Discuss how stereotyping, attribution, self-fulfilling prophecy, halo, false-consensus, primacy,

LLJ

LOE

and recency effects influence the perceptual process.

Discuss three ways to improve perceptions, with specific applications to organizational situations.

Outline the main features of a global mindset and justify its usefulness to employees and organizations.

 

 

years as a sales representative before joining this company. Edward is single and has no children.

Lee L. Lee has been with this organization for seven years. The first two years were spent as a sales representative in the office that she now manages. According to the regional direc- tor, Lee rates about average as a branch manager. She earned an undergraduate degree in geography from a major university and worked as a sales representative for four years with another insurance company before joining this organization. Lee is 40 years old, divorced, and has no children. She is a very ambi- tious person but sometimes has problems working with her staff and other branch managers.

Sandy S. Sandy is 47 years old and has been a branch manager with this company for 17 years. Seven years ago, her branch made the lowest contribution to the region’s profits, but this has steadily improved and is now slightly above average. Sandy seems to have a mediocre attitude toward her job but is well liked by her staff and other branch managers. Her experience in the insurance industry has been entirely with this organization. She previously worked in non-sales positions, and it is not clear how she became a branch manager without previous sales experi- ence. Sandy is married and has three school-aged children. Several years ago, Sandy earned a diploma in business from a nearby community college by taking evening courses.

Bonus Allocation Form

NAME INDIVIDUAL DECISION TEAM DECISION

Bob B.

Edward E.

Lee L.

Sandy S.

TOTALS:

 

 

 

 

$100,000 $100,000

lEgathy Inputs Form

INPUT FACTOR* INPUT WEIGHT**

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL: 100%

“List factors in order of importance, with most important factor listed first.

“*The weight of each factor is a percentage ranging from 1 to 100. All factor weights together must add up to 100 percent.

Copyright © 2000, 1983 Steven L. McShane.

SELF-ASSESSMENT 5.6 NEED-STRENGTH QUESTIONNAIRE Although everyone has the same innate drives, secondary or learned needs vary from one person to the next in the same situation. This self-assessment provides an estimate of your need strength on selected secondary needs. Read each of the statements below and check the response that you believe best reflects your position regarding each state- ment. Then use the scoring key in Appendix B at the end of

the book to calculate your results. To receive a meaningful estimate of your need strength, you should answer each item honestly and by reflecting on your personal experi- ences. Class discussion will focus on the meaning of the needs measured in this self-assessment, as well as their rel- evance in the workplace.

Personal Needs Questionnaire

HOW ACCURATELY DO EACH OF THE FOLLOWING

VERY ACCURATE MODERATELY

NEITHER ACCURATE MODERATELY VERY INACCURATE

STATEMENTS DESCRIBE YOU?

DESCRIPTION OF ME ACCURATE

NOR INACCURATE INACCURATE DESCRIPTION OF ME

 

I would rather be myself than be well thought of.

 

2. I’m the type of person who never gives up.

3. When the opportunity ❑ occurs, I want to be in charge.

4. I try not to say things that others don’t like to hear.

0

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(continued)

 

 

Personal Needs Questionnaire (continued)

HOW ACCURATELY DO EACH OF THE FOLLOWING STATEMENTS DESCRIBE YOU?

VERY ACCURATE DESCRIPTION OF ME

MODERATELY ACCURATE

NEITHER ACCURATE NOR INACCURATE

MODERATELY INACCURATE

VERY INACCURATE DESCRIPTION OF ME

5. I find it difficult to talk about my ideas if they are contrary to group opinion.

6. I tend to take control of things.

CI

7. I am not highly motivated to succeed.

❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑

8. I usually disagree with others only if I know my friends will back me up.

❑ ❑ ❑ ❑

9. I try to be the very best at what I do.

10. I seldom make excuses or apologize for my behavior.

11. If anyone criticizes me,

Cl

f I

❑ ❑ ❑

I can take it.

12. I try to outdo others. El ❑

13. I seldom change my opinion when people disagree with me.

1-1

14. I try to achieve more than what others have accomplished.

❑ CI

15. To get along and be liked, El ❑ I tend to be what people

expect me to be.

Sources: Adapted from instruments described and/or presented in L.R. Goldberg, J.A. Johnson, H.W. Eber, R. Hogan, M.C. Ashton, C.R. Cloninger, and H.C. Gough, “The International Personality Item Pool and the Future of Public-Domain Personality Measures:’ Journal of Research in Personality 40 (2006), pp. 84-96; H.J. Martin, “A Revised Measure of Approval Motivation and Its Relationship to Social Desirability,” Journal of Personality Assessment 48 (1984), pp. 508-19.

After reading this chapter go to www.mhhe.com/mcshane6e for more in-depth information and interactivities that correspond to the chapter.

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differences. Determine your group’s score in the same man- ner. Write these scores and summary statistics into the spaces below.

Your total score

Average of the individual scores in your group

Your group’s total score

Number of individuals in your group with a lower score than your group’s total score

SELF-ASSESSMENT 8.6 WHAT TEAM PURPOSE This self-assessment is designed to help you identify your preferred roles in meetings and similar team activities.

INSTRUCTIONS Read each of the statements below and circle the response that you believe best reflects your posi- tion regarding each statement. Then use the scoring key in

Source: Copyright © 1992 by Richard Field and Nicola Sutton. All rights reserved. Based on information in Joseph Graham Ambrosi, Hiking in Alberta’s Southwest (Vancouver, BC: Douglas & McIntyre Ltd., 1984); Gillean Daffern, Kananaskis Country: A Guide to Hiking, Skiing, Eques- trian & Bike Trails, 2nd ed. (Calgary, AB: Rocky Mountain Books, 1995); Patricia E. Kariel, Hiking Alberta’s David Thompson Country (Edmonton, AB: Lone Pine Publishing, 1987).

ROLES DO YOU PREFER? Appendix B at the end of the book to calculate your results for each team role. This exercise should be completed alone so that you can assess yourself honestly without concerns of social comparison. Class discussion will focus on the roles that people assume in team settings. This scale as- sesses only a few team roles.

Team Hales Preferences Scale

CIRCLE THE NUMBER THAT BEST REFLECTS YOUR POSITION REGARDING EACH OF THESE STATEMENTS

DOES NOT DESCRIBE ME AT ALL

DOES NOT DESCRIBE ME VERY WELL

DESCRIBES ME SOMEWHAT

DESCRIBES ME WELL

DESCRIBES ME VERY WELL

1. I usually take responsibility for getting the 1 2 3 4 5 team to agree on what the meeting should accomplish.

2. I tend to summarize to other team members 1 2 3 4 5 what the team has accomplished so far.

3. I’m usually the person who helps other team 1 2 3 4 5 members overcome their disagreements.

4. I try to ensure that everyone gets heard on 1 2 3 4 5 issues.

5. I’m usually the person who helps the team 1 2 3 4 5 determine how to organize the discussion.

6. I praise other team members for their ideas 1 2 3 4 5 more than do others in the meetings.

7. People tend to rely on me to keep track of 1 2 3 4 5 what has been said in meetings.

8. The team typically counts on me to prevent 1 2 3 4 5 debates from getting out of hand.

9. I tend to say things that make the group feel 1 2 3 4 5 optimistic about its accomplishments.

256

(continued)

 

 

terms of animals, you may encounter a bear looking for berries. While bear attacks on humans are not common, they are not unusual either. It is also possible that elk or moose may be encountered. These large plant eaters are not usually dangerous to humans, but they should be avoided during the mating season. There are also some in- sects to be considered. Ticks can carry Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, which can be fatal if left untreated. Bees can also be dangerous if the person stung has a strong allergic reaction.

You are all currently dressed in warm clothes, including wool socks and sturdy hiking boots, and each person has a day pack in which to carry those items that you deem necessary.

PART I: INDIVIDUAL DECISION There are 15 items listed below. Before you set out on your hike, your task is to rank these items according to their general importance for a hiker, not for you specifically. Rank the items from 1, the most important, to 15, the least important. No ties are allowed. You might want to consider, “If a hiker was allowed to take only one item, what would it be?” That item would be ranked number 1. Then, “If a hiker was allowed only one more item, what would it be?” That item would rank number 2. Write your rankings in the column titled “Your Ranking.” It is important to remember that the deci- sions that you are making are for your group as a whole and should not be influenced by factors affecting you as an individual.

YOUR

GROUP

EXPERT

YOUR

GROUP ITEMS

RANKING

RANKING

RANKING

SCORE

SCORE

Canteen with water

Matches

Compass

Hat

Repair kit (includes short length of cord, string, duct tape, and shoelaces)

First aid kit (includes blister protection and aspirin)

Five sleeping bags

Sunglasses

Flashlight

Topographic map and Kananaskis Country Trail guide book

Food

Five-person tent with waterproof fly

Sunscreen

Rain gear

Insect repellent

PART GROUP DECISION Now form groups. Take a few minutes to examine and discuss your individual assumptions before you begin to discuss how to rank spe- cific items. Use constructive controversy decision rules to guide your decision method and rank the 15 items again. These rules are as follows: (1) Be critical of ideas, not peo- ple; (2) focus on making the best possible decision, not winning; (3) encourage everyone to participate in the dis- cussion; (4) listen to everyone’s ideas, even if you do not agree; (5) restate what someone has said if their point is not clear to you; (6) bring out the ideas and facts supporting both sides of the argument and then try to integrate

them; (7) try to understand both sides of the issue under dis- cussion; and (8) change your mind if the evidence clearly indicates that you should do so.*

Write your group’s answers into the “Group Ranking” column.

PART III: SCORMIG Your instructor will inform you of how experts have ranked these 15 items. Write these rankings into the column titled “Expert Ranking.” To calculate your personal score, calculate for each of the 15 items the absolute difference between your ranking and the expert’s ranking, then sum these 15 absolute value

*D.VV. Johnson and F.P. Johnson. Joining Together: Group Theory and Group Skills. Upper Saddle River (Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill, 2009).

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Team Roles Preferences Scale (continued)

CIRCLE THE NUMBER THAT BEST REFLECTS YOUR POSITION REGARDING EACH OF THESE STATEMENTS

DOES NOT DESCRIBE ME AT ALL

DOES NOT DESCRIBE ME VERY WELL

DESCRIBES ME SOMEWHAT

DESCRIBES ME WELL

DESCRIBES ME VERY WELL

10. Team members usually count on me to give 1 2 3 4 5 everyone a chance to speak.

11. In most meetings, I am less likely than 1 2 3 4 5 others to criticize the ideas of teammates.

12. I actively help teammates to resolve their 1 2 3 4 5 differences in meetings.

13. I actively encourage quiet team members 1 2 3 4 5 to describe their ideas about each issue.

14. People tend to rely on me to clarify the 1 2 3 4 5 purpose of the meeting.

15. I like to be the person who takes notes 1 2 3 4 5 or minutes of the meeting.

Copyright © 2000 Steven L. McShane.

After reading this chapter go to www.mhhe.com/mcshane6e for more in-depth information and interactivities that correspond to the chapter.

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(9 Communicating in Teams and Organizations

learning objectives After reading this chapter, you should be able to:

LO1 Explain why communication is important in organizations, and discuss four influences on effective communication encoding and decoding.

Compare and contrast the advantages of and problems with electronic mail, other verbal communication media, and nonverbal communication.

LO3 Explain how social acceptance and media richness influence the preferred communication channel.

LO4 Discuss various barriers (noise) to effective communication, including cross-cultural and gender-based differences in communication.

LO5 Explain how to get messages across more effectively, and summarize the elements of active listening.

Summarize effective communication strategies in organizational hierarchies, and review the role and relevance of the organizational grapevine.

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VIGNETTE #3 One of your subordinates is working on an important project. He is an engineer who has good tech- nical skills and knowledge and was selected for the project team for that reason. He stops by your office and appears to be quite agitated: His voice is loud and strained, and his face has a look of bewilderment. He says, “I’m supposed to be working with four other people from four other depart- ments on this new project, but they never listen to my ideas and seem to hardly know I’m at the meeting!”

Develop three statements that respond to the speaker in this vignette by (a) showing empathy, (b) seeking clarifica- tion, and (c) providing nonevaluative feedback.

VIGNETTE #4 Your subordinate comes into your office in a state of agitation, asking if she can talk to you. She is polite and sits down. She seems calm and does not have an angry look on her face. However, she says, “It seems like you consistently make up lousy schedules; you are unfair and unrealistic in the kinds of assignments you give certain people, me included. Everyone else is so intimidated they don’t complain, but I think you need to know that this isn’t right and it’s got to change.”

Develop three statements that respond to the speaker in this vignette by (a) showing empathy, (b) seeking clarifica- tion, and (c) providing nonevaluative feedback.

TEAM EXERCISE 9.5 CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION GAME PURPOSE This exercise is designed to develop and test your knowledge of cross-cultural differences in communi- cation and etiquette.

MATERIALS The instructor will provide one set of question/answer cards to each pair of teams.

INSTRUCTIONS Step 1: The class is divided into an even number of teams. Ideally, each team would have three students. (Two- or four-student teams are possible if matched with an equal- sized team.) Each team is then paired with another team and the paired teams (Team “A’ and Team “B”) are assigned a private space away from other matched teams.

Step 2: The instructor will hand each pair of teams a stack of cards with the multiple-choice questions face down. These cards have questions and answers about cross-cultural dif- ferences in communication and etiquette. No books or other aids are allowed.

Step 3: The exercise begins with a member of Team A picking up one card from the top of the pile and asking

the question on that card to the members of Team B. The information given to Team B includes the question and all alternatives listed on the card. Team B has 30 seconds after the question and alternatives have been read to give an answer. Team B earns one point if the correct answer is given. If Team B’s answer is incorrect, however, Team A earns that point. Correct answers to each question are in- dicated on the card and, of course, should not be revealed until the question is correctly answered or time is up. Whether or not Team B answers correctly, it picks up the next card on the pile and reads it to members of Team A. In other words, cards are read alternatively to each team. This procedure is repeated until all of the cards have been read or time has expired. The team receiving the most points wins.

Important note: The textbook provides very little informa- tion pertaining to the questions in this exercise. Rather, you must rely on past learning, logic, and luck to win.

© 2011, 2001 Steven L. McShane.

SELF-ASSESSMENT 9.6 ARE YOU AN ACTIVE LISTENER? PURPOSE This self-assessment is designed to help you estimate your strengths and weaknesses on various dimen- sions of active listening.

INSTRUCTIONS Think back to face-to-face conversa- tions you have had with a coworker or client in the office, hallway, factory floor, or other setting. Indicate the extent to which each item in the following table describes your

behavior during those conversations. Answer each item as truthfully as possible so that you get an accurate estimate of where your active listening skills need improvement. Then use the scoring key in Appendix B to calculate your results for each scale. This exercise is completed alone so students assess themselves honestly without concerns of social com- parison. However, class discussion will focus on the impor- tant elements of active listening.

285

 

 

Active Listening Skills Inventory

WHEN LISTENING TO OTHERS IN FACE-TO-FACE, TELEPHONE, OR SIMILAR CONVERSATIONS, HOW OFTEN DO YOU DO THE FOLLOWING?

NEVER OR RARELY SELDOM SOMETIMES OFTEN

ALMOST ALWAYS

1. I keep an open mind when others describe their ideas.

2. I organize the speaker’s ideas while s/he is talking to me.

❑ ❑

111

❑ III

3. I ask questions to show I understand ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ and am focused on the speaker’s message.

4. I interrupt before the speaker 111 ❑ 111 ❑ 0 sufficiently presents his/her views.

5. While listening, I mentally sort out ❑ ❑ the speaker’s ideas so s/he makes

sense to me.

6. I use gestures and words (nodding, ❑ 111 111 111 agreeing ► to show I am listening.

7. I let my mind wander when listening ❑ ❑ 111 111 to people.

8. I try to visualize and feel the speaker’s ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ 0 experience while s/he is describing those events.

9. I summarize the speaker’s ideas to ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ confirm that I understand him/her correctly.

10. I focus on what the speaker is saying ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ to me even when it doesn’t sound interesting.

11. I see the topic from my perspective ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ rather than from the speaker’s perspective.

12. I show interest while listening III 111 ❑ ❑ to others.

© 2010 Steven L McShane.

After reading this chapter go to www.mhhe.com/mcshane6e for more in-depth information and interactivities that correspond to the chapter.

286

 

 

in losses in one year. They managed to keep everyone in line, resulting in countless transaction record irregulari- ties and over 800 breaches of the bank’s trading limits. Duffy and a few other traders were jailed for securities violations. Several executives, including both NAB’s chief executive and chairman, lost their jobs due to these events.

Discussion Questions

1. What were the main sources of power that Luke Duffy used to keep everyone in line with his irregular business

practices? Describe how he applied these power sources to influence subordinates and senior executives.

2. What contingencies strengthened Luke Duffy’s power at NAB’s foreign currency options desk?

3. What can companies do to minimize this sort of abuse of power and influence?

Sources: R. Gluyas, “Fear and Loathing in NAB’s Forex Fiasco,” The Australian, August 6, 2005, p. 35; E. Johnston, “Anything Goes: Ex-Trader Says,” Australian Financial Review, August 2, 2005, p. 3; E. Johnston, “Expletives and Stench in Hothouse of NAB Dealers,” Australian Financial Review, August 6, 2005, p. 3.

TEAM EXERCISE 10.3 IMPRESSION MANAGEMENT IN EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEWS

By Sandra Steen, University of Regina

PURPOSE This exercise is designed to help you examine impression management as it relates to employment interviews.

INSTRUCTIONS Step 1: Form teams with four or five members.

a) Identify specific principles or rules to help an inter- viewee guide the best response to each interviewer question.

b) Provide specific statements the interviewee should say in the interview to represent that principle/rule in action.

For example:

Interview Question: Why are you leaving your current job?

Principle/Rule: Keep positive; don’t criticize your cur- rent employer.

Possible Statement: “I enjoyed working at XYZ, but I was looking for more personal growth and develop- ment, which your company has a great reputation for.”

INTERVIEW QUESTIONS

• What interests you about this job? • What are your greatest weaknesses? • Describe a time when you had to deal with a profes-

sional disagreement or conflict with a coworker. • Is there anything you would like to avoid in your

next job? • How many times do a clock’s hands overlap in a day?

Step 2: The instructor will lead a class discussion about each of the interview questions.

1. What was your ideal answer? 2. What impression of your knowledge or skills were

you attempting to create with your ideal answer? 3. What is an example of an unsuitable interview

response?

Discussion Question

1. Why is it important that the personal brand you cultivate in an employment interview is an authentic representa- tion of your knowledge and skills?

TEAM EXERCISE 10.4 DECIPHERING THE NETWORK PURPOSE This exercise is designed to help you interpret social network maps, including their implications for orga- nizational effectiveness.

MATERIALS The instructor will distribute several social network diagrams to each student.

INSTRUCTIONS (SMALLER CLASSES) The instruc- tor will organize students into teams (typically four to seven people, depending on class size). Teams will examine each social network diagram to answer the following questions:

1. What aspects of this diagram suggest that the network is not operating as effectively as possible?

2. Which people in this network seem to be most powerful? Least powerful? What information or features of the diagram lead you to this conclusion?

3. If you were responsible for this group of people, how would you change this situation to improve their effectiveness?

After teams have diagnosed each social network map, the class will debrief by hearing each team’s assessments and recommendations.

INSTRUCTIONS (LA RGER CLASSES) This activity is also possible m large classes by projecting each social net- work diagram on a screen and giving students a minute or

313

 

 

two to examine the diagram. The instructor can then ask specific questions to the class, such as pointing to a specific individual in the network and asking whether he or she has high or low power, what level of centrality is apparent, and

whether the individual’s connections are mainly strong or weak ties. The instructor might also ask which quadrant on the map indicates the most concern and then allow indi- vidual students to provide an explanation as to why.

SELF-ASSESSMENT 10.5 HOW DO YOU INFLUENCE COWORKERS AND OTHER PEERS?

PURPOSE This exercise is designed to help you under- stand different forms of influence when working with co- workers (i.e., people at the same organizational level), as well as estimate your preference for each influence tactic in this context.

INSTRUCTIONS Think about the occasions when a co- worker disagreed with you, opposed your preference, or was reluctant to actively support your point of view about something at work. These conflicts might have been about company policy, assignment of job duties, distribution of resources, or any other matter. What did you do to try to get the coworker to support your preference?

The statements below describe ways that people try to influence coworkers. Thinking about your own behavior

over the past six months, how often did you engage in each of these behaviors to influence coworkers (i.e., people at a similar level in the organization)?* Circle the most accurate number for each statement. When done, use the scoring key in Appendix B to calculate your results. This exercise is completed alone so students assess themselves honestly without concerns of social comparison. However, class dis- cussion will focus on the types of influence in organiza- tions and which influence tactics are most and least successful or popular when influencing coworkers.

*Note: If you have not been in the workforce recently, complete this instrument thinking about influencing another student instead of a coworker.

Coworker Influence Scale

OVER THE PAST SIX MONTHS, HOW OFTEN DID YOU USE THE FOLLOWING TACTICS TO INFLUENCE COWORKERS?

RARELY/ NEVER SELDOM SOMETIMES OFTEN

ALMOST ALWAYS

1. Gave the coworker logical reasons why the 1 2 3 4 5 matter should be decided in my favor.

2. Made my authority or expertise regarding the 1 2 3 4 5 issue known without being obvious about it.

3. Tried to negotiate a solution, where I would offer 1 2 3 4 5 something in return for the coworker’s support.

4. Demanded that the matter should be resolved in 1 2 3 4 5 my favor.

5. Avoided showing the coworker information 1 2 3 4 5 that opposed my preference.

6. Enlisted the support of other employees so the 1 2 3 4 5 coworker would see that I have the more popular preference.

7. Claimed or demonstrated that my preference has 1 2 3 4 5 management support.

8. Said something positive about the coworker, 1 2 3 4 5 hoping this would increase his/her support for my views.

9. Tried to convince the coworker using factual 1 2 3 4 5 information and logic.

(continued)

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Coworker Influence Scale (continued)

OVER THE PAST SIX MONTHS, HOW OFTEN DID YOU USE THE FOLLOWING TACTICS TO INFLUENCE COWORKERS?

RARELY/ NEVER SELDOM SOMETIMES OFTEN

ALMOST ALWAYS

10. Subtly let the coworker know about my expertise 1 2 3 4 5 on the matter.

11. Offered to support or assist the coworker on 1 2 3 4 5 something if he/she would agree with me on

this matter.

12. Showed impatience or frustration with the 1 2 3 4 5

coworker’s opposition to my preference.

13. Presented information in a way that looked 1 2 3 4 5

better for my preference.

14. Claimed that other staff support my position on 1 2 3 4 5

this matter.

15. Suggested or threatened to have the issue 1 2 3 4 5

resolved by higher management.

16. Became friendlier toward the coworker, hoping 1 2 3 4 5

this would create a more favorable opinion of

my viewpoint.

17. Helped the coworker to see the benefits of my 1 2 3 4 5

preference and/or the negative outcomes of

other choices.

18. Quietly or indirectly showed the coworker my 1 2 3 4 5 authority, expertise, or right to have this matter

decided in my favor.

19. Mentioned that I had helped the coworker in the 1 2 3 4 5 past, hoping that he/she would reciprocate by supporting me now.

20. Let the coworker know that I might be 1 2 3 4 5

disagreeable or uncooperative in the future if he/she did not support me now.

21. Framed and selected information that mainly 1 2 3 4 5 agreed with (rather than opposed) my

preference.

22. Made sure that at least a few other people were 1 2 3 4 5

on my side of this issue.

23. Pointed out that my view was consistent with 1 2 3 4 5

the company’s values or policies.

24. Showed more respect toward the coworker, 1 2 3 4 5

hoping this would encourage him/her to

support me.

© 2011 Steven L. McShane.

After reading this chapter go to www.mhhe.com/mcshane6e for more in-depth information and interactivities that correspond to the chapter.

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I

1 1 Conflict and Negotiation in the Workplace / learning objectives

After reading this chapter, you should be able to:

LO1 Define conflict and debate its positive and negative consequences in the workplace.

LO ‘e Distinguish constructive from relationship conflict and describe three strategies to minimize relationship conflict during constructive conflict episodes.

LO3 Diagram the conflict process model and describe six structural sources of conflict in organizations.

LO4 Outline the five conflict handling styles and discuss the circumstances in which each would be most appropriate.

LO5 Apply the six structural approaches to conflict management and describe the three types of third- party dispute resolution.

L06 Describe the bargaining zone model and outline strategies that skilled negotiators use to claim value and create value in negotiations.

 

 

ACTION ALTERNATIVE RANKING (1 & 2)

1. Agree to accept the raw material in the different format.

2. Refuse to accept the material in the new format because it would cause a disruption in your operation.

3. Propose a solution where you accept material in the new format during the first shift but not during the second and third.

4. Tell Ted Smith that you do not wish to deal with the issue at this time, but that you will consider his request and get back to him at a later date.

5. You decide to tell Ted Smith of your concern regarding his failure to consult with you before installing new equipment. You inform him that you wish to find longer-term solutions to the conflict between you.

scENIARIO #5

Setting

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