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Business Research Methods – NOTICE: THIS IS POST GRADUATE LEVEL WORK AND YOUR PAPER SHOULD REFLECT SUCH! Read chapter 3 of the textbook:
Textbook: Cooper & Schindler, Business Research Methods (2014)
https://www.amazon.com/Business-Research-Methods-Donald-Cooper-ebook/dp/B00DC863CG
I will message you the Youtube link to the chapter.
Answer the following question:
Chapter 3 Question 5
An automobile manufacturer observes the demand for its brand increasing as per capita income increases. Sales increases also follow low interest rates, which ease credit conditions. Buyer purchase behavior is seen to be dependent on age and gender. Other factors influencing sales appear to fluctuate almost randomly (competitor advertising, competitor dealer discounts, introductions of new competitive models)
a. If sales and per capita income are positively related, classify all variables as dependent, independent, moderating, extraneous, or intervening.
a. Comment on the utility of a model based on the hypothesis.
Additional Information
The paper must fully meet the following:
• The prompt must fully addressed/answered in the thread.
• The thread is 500–750 words
• References at least four peer-reviewed sources (published with the last four years) and one biblical integration
• Provide integration of a biblical concept that supports the paper. Biblical integration is more than just quoting a verse. Be sure to explain the biblical principle seen in the verse and how that principle may be applied to the issue at hand.
• The Bible, NIV, KJV, and NKJV are all acceptable for use in this order.
• All sources are cited in current APA format.
• Proper spelling and grammar are used.
• Sentences are complete, clear, and concise
• The paper is writer in U.S. English
Scholarly Journals – What are they?
Scholarly journals (also called “professional” or “peer reviewed” journals) are a type of periodical. Other types of periodicals are magazines and newspapers.
Most online databases contain a limiter you can select so results only show certain types of journals. For best results, select “Journal Article” in the “Document Type” limiter (if it is available), as well as the “Peer Reviewed”* limiter.
*Items such as “letters to the editor,” book reviews, etc., are not peer reviewed, although they are found in peer reviewed journals.
Characteristics of Scholarly Journals
• Articles report on original research or experiments (as opposed to news or opinion pieces).
• Articles written by a scholar/author who has done research in a particular field or discipline.
• Language is technical and specialized.
• Sources cited in the form of footnotes or bibliographies.
• Often published by universities or professional societies.
Ensure that the paper has a great thesis statement:
• tells the reader how you will interpret the significance of the subject matter under discussion.
• is a road map for the paper; in other words, it tells the reader what to expect from the rest of the paper.
• directly answers the question asked of you. A thesis is an interpretation of a question or subject, not the subject itself. The subject, or topic, of an essay might be World War II or Moby Dick; a thesis must then offer a way to understand the war or the novel.
• makes a claim that others might dispute.
• is usually a single sentence somewhere in your first paragraph that presents your argument to the reader. The rest of the paper, the body of the essay, gathers and organizes evidence that will persuade the reader of the logic of your interpretation.
• A thesis statement is a short (just 1 or 2 sentences) clear summary of an argument. When writing a paper to convince others of something, a thesis statement should go at the end of the 1st paragraph.
1. References
A minimum of 8 recent scholarly articles (not textbooks, Wikipedia, or other popular reading magazines), in current APA format, must be included and must contain persistent links so others may have instant access.
1. Please review the APA Manual 6th Edition for proper listing of references. Page 198-203 Please check to make sure each citation is appropriately listed in the references Make sure you check each and every references for the following: Spacing errors
2. Punctuation
3. Capitalization in title
4. Missing italics for volume number
5. Missing italics in title
6. Incorrect use of italics
7. Capitalization errors
8. Incorrect URL or doi
9. Incorrect journal name
10. Missing volume number
11. Missing issue number
12. Missing page numbers
Example:
Author date Article title
Landsbury, J. (2007). Community efforts proven to increase empathy for the homeless.
Journal Name volume(issue), pages digital object identifier
Community Network Journal, 13(3), 1-10. doi:10.198/0005-9852.45.3.447
Journal Article without a DOI Number (include the home page of the journal, NOT the database name)
Hall, K., & Miller, D. (2009). Citation software: Use with caution. Journal of Technology and Research, 17(3), 344-756. Retrieved from http://www.jtr.org
Follow APA section 7.01, p. 198 and use a doi number or journal home page URL if a doi is not available. Note that most journals have doi numbers. Use crossref.org to find the doi or run a Google search with the article name to find doi numbers and then verify that the doi when entered into Google takes you to the correct article. Check all your articles.
If you found the article in a library database (ProQuest, EBSCO host), you will need to use Google to find the journal’s Website and provide its URL.
http://libguides.radford.edu/content.php?pid=219451&sid=1822715
Current APA format 6th edition is required
Business Research Methods – NOTICE: THIS IS POST GRADUATE LEVEL WORK AND YOUR PAPER SHOULD REFLECT SUCH!
Read chapter 3 of the textbook:
Textbook: Cooper & Schindler, Business Research Methods (2014)
https://www.amazon.com/Business-Research-Methods-Donald-Cooper-ebook/dp/B00DC863CG
I will message you the Youtube link to the chapter.
Answer the following question:
Chapter 3 Question 5
An automobile manufacturer observes the demand for its brand increasing as per capita income increases. Sales increases also follow low interest rates, which ease credit conditions. Buyer purchase behavior is seen to be dependent on age and gender. Other factors influencing sales appear to fluctuate almost randomly (competitor advertising, competitor dealer discounts, introductions of new competitive models)
a. If sales and per capita income are positively related, classify all variables as dependent, independent, moderating, extraneous, or intervening.
a. Comment on the utility of a model based on the hypothesis.
Additional Information
The paper must fully meet the following:
• The prompt must fully addressed/answered in the thread.
• The thread is 500–750 words
• References at least four peer-reviewed sources (published with the last four years) and one biblical integration
• Provide integration of a biblical concept that supports the paper. Biblical integration is more than just quoting a verse. Be sure to explain the biblical principle seen in the verse and how that principle may be applied to the issue at hand.
• The Bible, NIV, KJV, and NKJV are all acceptable for use in this order.
• All sources are cited in current APA format.
• Proper spelling and grammar are used.
• Sentences are complete, clear, and concise
• The paper is writer in U.S. English
Scholarly Journals – What are they?
Scholarly journals (also called “professional” or “peer reviewed” journals) are a type of periodical. Other types of periodicals are magazines and newspapers.
Most online databases contain a limiter you can select so results only show certain types of journals. For best results, select “Journal Article” in the “Document Type” limiter (if it is available), as well as the “Peer Reviewed”* limiter.
*Items such as “letters to the editor,” book reviews, etc., are not peer reviewed, although they are found in peer reviewed journals.
Characteristics of Scholarly Journals
• Articles report on original research or experiments (as opposed to news or opinion pieces).
• Articles written by a scholar/author who has done research in a particular field or discipline.
• Language is technical and specialized.
• Sources cited in the form of footnotes or bibliographies.
• Often published by universities or professional societies.
Ensure that the paper has a great thesis statement:
• tells the reader how you will interpret the significance of the subject matter under discussion.
• is a road map for the paper; in other words, it tells the reader what to expect from the rest of the paper.
• directly answers the question asked of you. A thesis is an interpretation of a question or subject, not the subject itself. The subject, or topic, of an essay might be World War II or Moby Dick; a thesis must then offer a way to understand the war or the novel.
• makes a claim that others might dispute.
• is usually a single sentence somewhere in your first paragraph that presents your argument to the reader. The rest of the paper, the body of the essay, gathers and organizes evidence that will persuade the reader of the logic of your interpretation.
• A thesis statement is a short (just 1 or 2 sentences) clear summary of an argument. When writing a paper to convince others of something, a thesis statement should go at the end of the 1st paragraph.
1. References
A minimum of 8 recent scholarly articles (not textbooks, Wikipedia, or other popular reading magazines), in current APA format, must be included and must contain persistent links so others may have instant access.
1. Please review the APA Manual 6th Edition for proper listing of references. Page 198-203 Please check to make sure each citation is appropriately listed in the references Make sure you check each and every references for the following: Spacing errors
2. Punctuation
3. Capitalization in title
4. Missing italics for volume number
5. Missing italics in title
6. Incorrect use of italics
7. Capitalization errors
8. Incorrect URL or doi
9. Incorrect journal name
10. Missing volume number
11. Missing issue number
12. Missing page numbers
Example:
Author date Article title
Landsbury, J. (2007). Community efforts proven to increase empathy for the homeless.
Journal Name volume(issue), pages digital object identifier
Community Network Journal, 13(3), 1-10. doi:10.198/0005-9852.45.3.447
Journal Article without a DOI Number (include the home page of the journal, NOT the database name)
Hall, K., & Miller, D. (2009). Citation software: Use with caution. Journal of Technology and Research, 17(3), 344-756. Retrieved from https://www.jtr.org
Follow APA section 7.01, p. 198 and use a doi number or journal home page URL if a doi is not available. Note that most journals have doi numbers. Use crossref.org to find the doi or run a Google search with the article name to find doi numbers and then verify that the doi when entered into Google takes you to the correct article. Check all your articles.
If you found the article in a library database (ProQuest, EBSCO host), you will need to use Google to find the journal’s Website and provide its URL.
https://libguides.radford.edu/content.php?pid=219451&sid=1822715
Current APA format 6th edition is required
the paper must adhere to APA 6th edition standards and have no issues with grammar, sentence structure, etc.
The purpose of this presentation is to briefly discuss the major types of logical fallacies. This is an essential skill for the business researcher.
The irrelevant conclusion diverts the attention away from addressing the claim in a dispute instead of analyzing its content. This is also called a “red herring”. There are a number of special cases of irrelevant conclusions.
? Appeal to authority
? Purely personal considerations
? Appeal to the majority or popular sentiment
? Appeal to loyalty
? Appeal to fear
? Appeal to pity — aims at arousing irrelevant pity for getting one’s claim accepted.
? Appeal to ignorance — forwards the proposition under dispute without any certain proof.
? Genetic fallacy — assumes a perceived defect in the origin of a claim discredits the claim itself.
Argument from ignorance – assuming that a claim is true (or false) because it has not been proven false (true) or cannot be proven false (true).
Argument from repetition – signifies that it has been discussed extensively until nobody cares to discuss it anymore.
Argument from silence – where the conclusion is based on the absence of evidence, rather than the existence of evidence.
Begging the question – the failure to provide what is essentially the conclusion of an argument as a premise, if so required.
(shifting the) Burden of proof – I need not prove my claim, you must prove it is false.
Circular reasoning – when the reasoner begins with what he or she is trying to end up with.
Circular cause and consequence – where the consequence of the phenomenon is claimed to be its root cause.
Continuum fallacy – improperly rejecting a claim for being imprecise.
Correlation proves causation – a faulty assumption that correlation between two variables implies that one causes the other.
Ecological fallacy – inferences about the nature of specific individuals are based solely upon aggregate statistics collected for the group to which those individuals belong.
Etymological fallacy – which reasons that the original or historical meaning of a word or phrase is necessarily similar to its actual present-day meaning.
Fallacy of composition – assuming that something true of part of a whole must also be true of the whole.
Fallacy of division – assuming that something true of a thing must also be true of all or some of its parts.
False dilemma (false dichotomy, fallacy of bifurcation, black-or-white fallacy) – two alternative statements are held to be the only possible options, when in reality there are more.
If-by-whiskey – an argument that supports both sides of an issue by using terms that are selectively emotionally sensitive.
Fallacy of many questions (complex question, fallacy of presupposition, loaded question) – someone asks a question that presupposes something that has not been proven or accepted by all the people involved. This fallacy is often used rhetorically, so that the question limits direct replies to those that serve the questioner’s agenda.
Ludic fallacy – the belief that the outcomes of a non-regulated random occurrences can be encapsulated by a statistic; a failure to take into account unknown unknowns in determining the probability of an event’s taking place.
Fallacy of the single cause (causal oversimplification) – it is assumed that there is one, simple cause of an outcome when in reality it may have been caused by a number of only jointly sufficient causes.
False attribution – an advocate appeals to an irrelevant, unqualified, unidentified, biased or fabricated source in support of an argument.
Fallacy of quoting out of context – refers to the selective excerpting of words from their original context in a way that distorts the source’s intended meaning.
Argument to moderation (false compromise, middle ground, fallacy of the mean) – assuming that the compromise between two positions is always correct.
Gambler’s fallacy – the incorrect belief that separate, independent events can affect the likelihood of another random event. If a coin flip lands on heads 10 times in a row, the belief that it is “due to land on tails” is incorrect.
Historian’s fallacy – occurs when one assumes that decision makers of the past viewed events from the same perspective and having the same information as those subsequently analyzing the decision. (Not to be confused with presentism, which is a mode of historical analysis in which present-day ideas, such as moral standards, are projected into the past.)
Inflation Of Conflict – The experts of a field of knowledge disagree on a certain point, so the scholars must know nothing, and therefore the legitimacy of their entire field is put to question.
Incomplete comparison – where not enough information is provided to make a complete comparison.
Inconsistent comparison – where different methods of comparison are used, leaving one with a false impression of the whole comparison.
Irrelevant conclusion, missing the point – an argument that may in itself be valid, but does not address the issue in question.
Kettle logic – using multiple inconsistent arguments to defend a position.
Mind projection fallacy – when one considers the way he sees the world as the way the world really is.
Moving the goalposts (raising the bar) – argument in which evidence presented in response to a specific claim is dismissed and some other (often greater) evidence is demanded.
Nirvana fallacy (perfect solution fallacy) – when solutions to problems are rejected because they are not perfect.
Proof by verbosity ( proof by intimidation) – submission of others to an argument too complex and verbose to reasonably deal with in all its intimate details.
Prosecutor’s fallacy – a low probability of false matches does not mean a low probability of some false match being found.
Psychologist’s fallacy – an observer presupposes the objectivity of his own perspective when analyzing a behavioral event.
Red herring – a speaker attempts to distract an audience by deviating from the topic at hand by introducing a separate argument which the speaker believes will be easier to speak to.
Regression fallacy – ascribes cause where none exists. The flaw is failing to account for natural fluctuations. It is frequently a special kind of the post hoc fallacy.
Retrospective determinism – the argument that because some event has occurred, its occurrence must have been inevitable beforehand.
Shotgun argumentation – the arguer offers such a large number of arguments for their position that the opponent can’t possibly respond to all of them.
Special pleading – where a proponent of a position attempts to cite something as an exemption to a generally accepted rule or principle without justifying the exemption.
Wrong direction – cause and effect are reversed. The cause is said to be the effect and vice versa.

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