Based on your analysis of the PRC-Taiwan scenario, prepare a narrative essay ranking the three hypotheses (from most likely to occur to the least likely to occur). Remember, ACH Step 7 is the most imp

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Based on your analysis of the PRC-Taiwan scenario, prepare a narrative essay ranking the three hypotheses (from most likely to occur to the least likely to occur). Remember, ACH Step 7 is the most important step of all and accounts for a significant portion of your course grade.


General Requirements

1. Document Format.

a. MS Word document

b. One-inch (1”) margins

c. Times New Roman Font

d. Twelve (12) pitch

e. 6-7 pages not including cover page and bibliography

2. Citation Format: The Chicago Manual of Style.

3. Graphics are not allowed.

4. As stated in the grading rubric, students must (1) employ imaginative approaches to answer the question being asked; (2) display an impressive command of the subject matter beyond the immediately obvious; (3) demonstrate a high level of critical thinking y reflection current and world views, and genuine intellectual development; and (4) excel in explaining all major points using multiple examples from the course readings or individual research.


Title Page

(a) Title of the paper: The PRC-Taiwan Crisis; Assessing Alternative Outcomes

(b) Student Name.

(c) Course Number.

(d) Instructor Name.

(e) Date the paper was completed.


Paper Body Format:

You should submit a narrative essay and not an outline. The outline below is intended to help you ensure you include all required elements.


Section I: Introduction

(a) This section

briefly

summarizes the scenario and the three potential outcomes (Diplomatic Solution or Limited Intervention or Direct Attack). Your thesis statement should be your assessment


Section II–Outcome Assessed to Be Most Likely to Occur: [Direct Attack]

(a) Provide insight as to how you arrived at your conclusion.

(b) Provide examples from the ACH Matrix supporting and refuting each hypothesis (Step #3).

(c) Identify the “linchpin” evidence and discuss how it ultimately drove your analysis (Step #4).

(d) State the underlying assumptions associated with your linchpin evidence (Step #6)


Section III– Second Most Likely to Occur: [enter outcome here]

(a) Provide insight as to how you arrived at your conclusion.

(b) Provide examples from the ACH Matrix supporting and refuting each hypothesis (Step #3).

(c) Identify the “linchpin” evidence and discuss how it ultimately drove your analysis (Step #4).

(d) State the underlying assumptions associated with your linchpin evidence (Step #6)


Section IV- Least Likely to Occur: [enter outcome here]

(a) Provide insight as to how you arrived at your conclusion.

(b) Provide examples from the ACH Matrix supporting and refuting each hypothesis (Step #3).

(c) Identify the “linchpin” evidence and discuss how it ultimately drove your analysis (Step #4).

(d) State the underlying assumptions associated with your linchpin evidence (Step #6)


Section V: Conclusion


Section VI: Bibliography


***Notes on citations and bibliography:

(a) If the information comes directly from the PRC-Taiwan scenario; no citation is required, unless it’s directly quoted.

(b) If the information comes from a source other than the PRC-Taiwan scenario, then it must be cited using the CMS format.

(c) A bibliography is required only if information contained in your report comes from a source other than the PRC-Taiwan scenario. The bibliography must contain all sources

consulted and cited

in preparing your paper. This includes course readings other than the scenario.

Based on your analysis of the PRC-Taiwan scenario, prepare a narrative essay ranking the three hypotheses (from most likely to occur to the least likely to occur). Remember, ACH Step 7 is the most imp
Brian Wood The following templates should be used to enter the information for Steps 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8 (Step 7 will be reported in an essay). Please download and save a copy of this template on your computer. Note: Grades for ACH Steps 2-6 will be entered directly into the Educator system ACH Step Two: Evidence For and Evidence Against Each Hypothesis ACH Steps Three and Four: Assess Evidence for “Diagnosticity” and Eliminate Evidence ACH Steps Five and Six: (5) Eliminate Hypotheses” and (6) Identify Linchpin Evidence Hypothesis  Evidence  (H1a) List three pieces of evidence indicating the crisis will be resolved diplomatically. (H1)Political Solution (H2)Limited. Intervention (H3)Direct Attack  Evidence #1Linchpin Taiwan’s current President Chen Shui-bian (DPP) agreed to send representatives to the mainland to discuss the “current situation.” Comment: Shows the ability to try a diplomatic solution (+) (+) (-)  Evidence #2 Shu Chin-Chiang claims over the past 55 years, Taiwan and PRC have developed “unique, defining characteristics” causing each “entity” to take “divergent paths.” (+) (+) (-)  Evidence #3 Hypothesis  Evidence  (H1b) List three pieces of evidence indicating the crisis will not be resolved diplomatically. (H1)Political Solution (H2)Limited. Intervention (H3)Direct Attack  Evidence #1 Taiwan’s Central News Agency is reporting Taiwan’s National Security Bureau (NSB) has uncovered plans by the PRC to increase tensions between the two countries should Shu Chin-Chiang (TSU) be elected. (-) (-) (+)  Evidence #2 Chen Shui-bian emphasizes this action is purely defensive and is designed to demonstrate Taiwan’s ability to democratically elect a new president without any “external influence or intervention.” (+) (+) (-)  Evidence #3 Missile tests have been ordered, it appears military action is more likely than diplomatic. (-) (-) (+) Hypothesis  Evidence  (H2a) List three pieces of evidence indicating the crisis will be resolved with limited intervention. (H1)Political Solution (H2)Limited. Intervention (H3)Direct Attack  Evidence #1 the US could not guarantee political, or let alone military support, should a confrontation with the PRC occur (//) (+) (//)  Evidence #2Linchpin Said one high ranking US official “should Shu claim independence, there is no way the US President will send US forces near Taiwan.”Comment: Directly states US forces will not be sent. (-) (+) (//)  Evidence #3 “Taiwan’s President Chen Shui-bian (DPP) issued a statement that negotiations with the PRC were “progressing” and that Taiwan was contemplating lowering their military alert status as a sign of “goodwill.” (+) (+) (-) Hypothesis  Evidence  (H2b) List three pieces of evidence indicating the crisis will not be resolved with limited intervention. (H1)Political Solution (H2)Limited. Intervention (H3)Direct Attack  Evidence #1 Open source reporting suggests the PRC’s Hu Jintao appealed directly to the United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon to intervene in the crisis. (//) (-) (-)  Evidence #2 The People’s Daily, a newspaper of the CCP ran a series of articles criticizing the elections and the US’ silence on the issue, suggesting the elections may be part of a larger US plan to “bring war on the Chinese people.” (//) (+) (//)  Evidence #3 During a televised press conference, President Obama cautioned Shu Chin-Chiang to accept the “status quo” by not (unnecessarily) increasing tensions in a politically charged environment. (-) (+) (-) Hypothesis  Evidence  (H3a) List three pieces of evidence indicating the crisis will be resolved with a direct attack. (H1)Political Solution (H2)Limited. Intervention (H3)Direct Attack  Evidence #1 The US Pacific Command reports Fighter Regiment patrols within the Taiwan Straits have increased by 50%. (-) (-) (+)  Evidence #2Linchpin The PLA has issued tentative mobilization orders to several air and ground units in the PRC. The orders are believed to be in preparation for deployment into the Nanjing Military District, which is located directly across from Taiwan.Comment: Mobilization may lead to aggressive behavior and attacks. (-) (-) (+)  Evidence #3 USAF Electronic Intelligence reporting indicates the 96th Missile Regiment near Nanping is calibrating their equipment in preparation for a CSS-6 missile launch. (-) (-) (+) Hypothesis  Evidence  (H3b) List three pieces of evidence indicating the crisis will not be resolved with a direct attack. (H1)Political Solution (H2)Limited. Intervention (H3)Direct Attack  Evidence #1 Despite the tenuous situation regarding the status of Taiwan, the PRC and Taiwan have significantly increased economic and cultural ties as both nations’ economies have experienced tremendous growth. (+) (+) (-)  Evidence #2  Evidence #3 Points Possible Points Earned Note: Grades for Step Eight will be entered directly into the Educator system Week 8 – ACH Step Eight: Develop Indicators Indicator Description #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #8 #10 Timeliness Were the indicators submitted on time (points subtracted)? Possible 10.0 Earned
Based on your analysis of the PRC-Taiwan scenario, prepare a narrative essay ranking the three hypotheses (from most likely to occur to the least likely to occur). Remember, ACH Step 7 is the most imp
The Chinese Civil War The Chinese Civil War began in 1927 when a coalition government between the Nationalist Kuomintang (KMT) and the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) was dissolved. Determined to eliminate the CCP as a political entity, Chiang Kai-shek launched a military offensive to place the country under KMT control. Chiang succeeded in bringing the eastern portion of China under his control and forced the communists led by Mao Tse Tung (right) to retreat into the Chinese interior. War Against Japan After years of meddling in Chinese affairs, Japan sent the Kwantung Army into Manchuria and established the puppet state of Manchukuo with Puyi (the last emperor of the Qing dynasty) as emperor in 1932. Realizing a war against Japan was inevitable, Chiang Kai-Shek (left) was forced to enter into a “ceasefire” with the Communists in 1936. Although the KMT and CCP agreed to fight the Japanese together, the KMT (by virtue of possessing the eastern most portions of China) were forced to fight the Japanese without any significant assistance from the CCP. Without having to mount any large scale attacks against the Japanese, the CCP used this time to solidify their holdings and expand their army. Post War – WWII China Following the Japanese surrender in 1945, the KMT began a futile attempt to reassert control over Manchuria; however, with their industrial infrastructure in shambles and popular support firmly on the side of the communists, the KMT struggled to regain their pre-war status. With massive amounts of assistance from the US, Chiang was able to occupy portions of Manchuria. In order to support a settlement negotiated by General George C. Marshall, both Chiang and Mao agreed to reduce the size of their armies by nearly 1.5 million men. Whereas Chiang discharged soldiers loyal to the KMT, Mao used the opportunity to purge political opponents. Supported by large stashes of captured Japanese equipment, the CCP spent 1945-46 preparing for the resumption of hostilities. The Nationalist Defeat Unable to secure a lasting cease fire, General Marshal departed China in February 1947. Immediately afterwards, the Chinese Civil War entered into its final phase as the US backed KMT and Soviet backed CCP resumed fighting. With the majority of their support coming from the middle and upper classes, the KMT was unable to garner enough rural support to halt the CCP’s steady advance. When coupled with the faltering economy and widespread corruption by KMT leaders, the tide of the war turned against the KMT as the CCP quickly consolidated their rural gains and began assaulting KMT urban strongholds. By mid-1949, the Nationalist cities of Beijing and Nanjing fell to the CCP as they extended their control to the Northern and eastern parts of the country. While still pursuing Nationalist forces in southern China, Mao proclaimed the People’s Republic of China (with Beijing as its capital) on October 1st 1949. In order to avoid defeat, Chiang and his 600,000 man army fled to the island of Taiwan, and in December 1949 proclaimed the Republic of China with Taipei as its capital. Continued Hostilities With North Korea’s invasion of South Korea in 1950, the conflict between the two China’s took on added significance when the US adopted a policy of “containing” the communist threat. With increasing amounts of US military aid, the PRC and Taiwan spent the next 20 years engaged in a series of skirmishes intended to destabilize the opposing governments. With the PRC lacking an amphibious capability and Taiwan unable to mount anything more than coastal raids, sporadic fighting between the two sides continued unabated. In 1955, the US established a formal commitment to defend Taiwan when Congress passed the Formosa Resolutions Act. Later that year, a negotiated settlement between the two sides was reached when the KMT agreed to withdraw from the Dachen and Nanchi islands while the PLA agreed to stop bombarding Taiwanese islands. Along with the commitment to defend Taiwan, the US began equipping the KMT with modern fighters, missiles and naval vessels. PRC Recognition Despite a series of efforts by several members of Congress to oppose the measure, in October 1971 the United Nations adopted Resolution 2758 calling for the PRC to be recognized as the legitimate government of China. In February of 1972, the US and PRC released the Shanghai Communiqué calling for both countries to work together in order to normalize relations. In the communiqué, the US agreed to support the “One-China Policy” acknowledging there is only one China (although not necessarily the PRC). In 1978, President Jimmy Carter announced the US was normalizing relations with the PRC and would sever formal relations with Taiwan. In response to President Carter’s action, Congress passed the Taiwan Relations Act calling for the US to consider any effort to determine the future of Taiwan by other than peaceful means (including boycotts and embargoes) as a threat to the peace and security of the Pacific and of grave concern to the US and made formal provisions for providing Taiwan with weapons “of a defensive nature.” Current PRC – Taiwan Relations Beginning in the 1990’s, relations between the PRC and Taiwan improved with a few notable exceptions. In 1992, Taiwan’s President Lee Teng-hui indicated he would no longer challenge the right of the PRC to rule the mainland, thereby shifting the debate to which nation had legitimacy overt Taiwan. In an attempt to intimidate the Taiwanese people into voting against Lee Teng-hui (whom the PRC characterized as a candidate attempting to “divide the motherland”), the PRC fired several missiles inside of Taiwan’s territorial waters during the 1996 Presidential elections. In order to prevent the crisis from escalating into a war, the US dispatched two carrier battle groups to Taiwan Straits as a show of resolve. As a reminder to Taiwan and the US, the PRC passed the Anti-Cessation Law formalizing their long standing policy to use “non-peaceful means” against the “Taiwan independence movement” should Taiwan declare their independence. Despite the tenuous situation regarding the status of Taiwan, the PRC and Taiwan have significantly increased economic and cultural ties as both nations’ economies have experienced tremendous growth.
Based on your analysis of the PRC-Taiwan scenario, prepare a narrative essay ranking the three hypotheses (from most likely to occur to the least likely to occur). Remember, ACH Step 7 is the most imp
90 Days Prior to the Election As the Taiwanese elections reach the 90-day mark, the race for the presidency is at a statistical dead-heat. The KMT’s candidate (and current Mayor of Taipei) Ma Ying Jeon holds a 50.40% to 49.60% lead over the TSU’s candidate Shu Chin-Chiang. Coverage of the elections in the PRC’s state-run media Xinhua has focused on two main themes.The first centers on veiled warnings to both candidates to avoid unnecessarily increasing tensions by injecting inflammatory issues (i.e. Taiwan independence) into the election. Their second theme has focused on condemning the TSU’s Shu Chin-Chiang as a “reckless war mongerer” whose election would “irreparably damage the spirit surrounding positive negotiations.” On the diplomatic front, Taiwan’s Central News Agency is reporting representatives from Ma Ying Jeon KMT are believed to be in the PRC conducting undisclosed negotiations. 85 Days Prior to the Election After unleashing a new attack on Shu Chin-Chiang’s alleged involvement in a two-year old corruption scandal, Ma Ying Jeon (KMT-52.05%) has increased his lead over Shu Chin-Chiang (TSU-47.95%) by 4.1%. Although Shu Chin-Chiang was exonerated of any involvement in the cash-for-votes scandal, he realizes his vulnerability and has begun holding a series of high-level party meetings to develop a new strategy. 80 Days Prior to the Election Ma Ying Jeon’s (KMT-54.55%) continued attacks on Shu Chin-Chiang (TSU-45.45%) has expanded his lead to 9.1%. With less than three months to go before the election, Shu Chin-Chiang’s campaign seems to be in a state of paralysis and unless a counterattack is launched soon, Shu Chin-Chiang’s chances for winning the presidency will slip away. 75 DAYS PRIOR TO THE ELECTION Taiwan’s Central News Agency is reporting Taiwan’s National Security Bureau (NSB) has uncovered plans by the PRC to increase tensions between the two countries should Shu Chin-Chiang (TSU) be elected. Although the Central News Agency refused to divulge their sources for the report, they insisted the accuracy and reliability of the information was “100% certain”. Ma Ying Jeon’s (KMT-54.95%) lead over Shu Chin-Chiang (TSU-45.05%) has continued to grow, albeit at a slower pace. 70 DAYS PRIOR TO THE ELECTION In the wake of the Central News Agency’s report, Shu Chin-Chiang (TSU) has launched a blistering attack on the KMT for conspiring with the PRC to influence the outcome of the presidential elections. Citing Taiwan’s Central News Agency report that KMT members were in the PRC approximately three weeks earlier, Shu Chin-Chiang (TSU) accused the KMT of “working with the enemy in order to maintain their political control.” In addition to vehement denials by Ma Ying Jeon, the PRC’s Xinhua news agency ran an editorial claiming Chiang’s accusations were “baseless lies designed to increase tensions between the PRC and its province.” In light of the alleged PRC plan, public opinion within Taiwan appears to be shifting towards the TSU. The latest poll numbers show Ma Ying Jeon’s (KMT-54.15%) lead over Shu Chin-Chiang (TSU-45.85%) weakening slightly to 8.3%. 65 DAYS PRIOR TO THE ELECTION Concerned the PRC may be attempting to interfere with “domestic affairs,” Taiwan’s current president Chen Shui-bian (Democratic Progressive Party) increases the alert status of Taiwan defense forces. Chen Shui-bian emphasizes this action is purely defensive and is designed to demonstrate Taiwan’s ability to democratically elect a new president without any “external influence or intervention.” During a campaign rally in Taipei, Shu Chin-Chiang (TSU-48.34%) continues to blast Ma Ying Jeon’s (KMT-51.66%) “collusion with the enemy” and claims the Taiwanese people (as evidenced by his increasing poll numbers) will not stand idly by as the PRC “meddles” in Taiwan’s affairs. In the PRC, the Xinhua news agency condemned Shu Chin-Chiang’s actions as “reckless, hostile, and suicidal” and again claimed the Taiwanese people will not to support a proven “liar and manipulator.” In response to Chen Shui-bian’s decision to increase the readiness level of Taiwan forces, the Chief of the PLA’s General Staff, General Liang Guanglie announce a series of unrelated naval exercises would be conducted “near Taiwan.” 60 DAYS PRIOR TO THE ELECTION As tensions between Taiwan and PRC increase, Shu Chin-Chiang (TSU-51.78%) has taken his first lead (3.56%) over Ma Ying Jeon (KMT-48.22%). During a massive campaign rally in Tungkang, Shu Chin-Chiang claims over the past 55 years, Taiwan and PRC have developed “unique, defining characteristics” causing each “entity” to take “divergent paths.” Taiwan intelligence is reporting a dramatic increase in military communications between PLA, PLAAF, and PLAN units along the PRC’s eastern coast. The nature of the communications is unknown. The Xinhua news began airing commentaries from CCP officials condemning the “renegade province” for engaging in “reckless behavior.” 55 DAYS PRIOR TO THE ELECTION Shu Chin-Chiang’s (TSU-53.27%) lead over Ma Ying Jeon (KMT-46.73%) continues to widen (6.54%) as Shu Chin-Chiang makes veiled references of independence. To date, Shu Chin-Chiang has not directly used the word “independence,” however it has become clear to all observers that Shu Chin-Chiang is headed in that direction. Taiwan’s current President Chen Shui-bian (DPP) issued a public warning to Shu Chin-Chiang (TSU) to avoid antagonizing the PRC by making “inflammatory comments.” Said Chen Shui-bian “I will not stand by and let one man’s political desires place 23 million people at risk.” According to the Pacific Command, flight activity at Shantou, Fuzhou, and Luqiao air force bases has increased significantly within the past 48 hours. Reporting from the National Security Agency indicates a spike in communications activity at Zhangzhou and Whenzhou Naval bases. The People’s Daily, a newspaper of the CCP ran a series of articles criticizing the elections and the US’ silence on the issue, suggesting the elections may be part of a larger US plan to “bring war on the Chinese people.” 50 DAYS PRIOR TO THE ELECTION Shu Chin-Chiang’s (TSU-55.19%) continued references to “unique, defining characteristics” and “divergent paths” has expanded his lead (10.36%) over Ma Ying Jeon (KMT-44.83%) and appears to be headed towards victory. The People’s Liberation Army Daily (the PLA’s official newspaper) proclaimed “The armed forces of the PRC stand ready to crush anyone seeking to undermine the CCP’s sovereign authority.” In a meeting with a reporter from the Washington Times, two unnamed Pentagon sources confirmed the PRC is in the process of conducting a limited mobilization of air, land, and sea forces opposite Taiwan. Seeking to defuse a potential confrontation, Taiwan’s current President Chen Shui-bian (DPP) agreed to send representatives to the mainland to discuss the “current situation.” 45 DAYS PRIOR TO THE ELECTION During a formal press conference, Ma Ying Jeon (KMT-41.37%) criticized Shu Chin-Chiang (TSU-58.63%) for “unnecessarily increasing tensions [that could] bring grave consequences to the entire region.” In response, Shu Chin-Chiang stated “I am simply following the will of the people. “Taiwan’s President Chen Shui-bian (DPP) issued a statement that negotiations with the PRC were “progressing” and that Taiwan was contemplating lowering their military alert status as a sign of “goodwill.” Taiwan’s intelligence service confirmed the PLA has ordered the 1st, 2nd, and 4th Infantry divisions to begin mobilizing. Satellite imagery also revealed two PLAN anti-ship submarines from Ningbo have departed port and their exact location is unknown. The Xinhua news agency is airing footage of PLAAF fighters and bombers conducting exercises against a “renegade force seeking to destabilize the PRC.” The footage included the launching of cruise missiles against surface targets and air-to-air combat. It is unclear when the footage was originally taken. 40 DAYS PRIOR TO THE ELECTION Ma Ying Jeon (KMT-41.88%) continued to verbally attack Shu Chin-Chiang (TSU-58.12%) for unnecessarily increasing tensions with the PRC. Ma appears to be shifting his strategy towards attacking Shu in hopes the Taiwanese people will place “common sense” above “nationalism.” According to all-source intelligence from the US’ Strategic Command, the 99th and 98th missile regiments successfully fired two CSS-6 short range missiles into a test range located in central China. A spokesman for the PLA’s Second Artillery Force claimed the launches were part of a planned test to ensure missile reliability. The National Security Agency reported the PLAN has ordered submarines from Canton, Zhangzhou, and Whenzhou to prepare for “operations.” The PLAN also ordered the naval squadron at Canton to prepare for “extended” operations. 35 DAYS PRIOR TO THE ELECTION With only 35 days remaining until the elections, Ma Ying Jeon’s (KMT-41.45%) attacks against Shu Chin-Chiang (TSU-58.55%) have failed to produce a significant change within the polls as he trails by 17.1%. Although not officially advocating independence, Shu continues to insist he is only following the will of the Taiwanese people. The People’s Liberation Army Daily announced a series of live fire missile tests would be conducted “off the Chinese coast within the very near future.” The PLA’s 25th and 79th Airborne divisions have been placed on alert while unconfirmed reporting suggests PLA Amphibious squadrons in Zhangzhou and Whenzhou have been ordered to participate in a large scale exercise scheduled to begin within the next 10 days. In a closed door meeting with top communist officials, the Premier of the CPC Hu Jintao reportedly told the Chief of the PLA’s General Staff, General Liang Guanglie to review “all applicable plans.” 30 DAYS PRIOR TO THE ELECTION Ma Ying Jeon’s (KMT-40.04%) inability to counter Shu Chin-Chiang’s (TSU-59.60%) attacks has made his defeat all but certain, trailing by 19.56 percentage points. Open source reporting suggests the PRC’s Hu Jintao appealed directly to the United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon to intervene in the crisis. Given the PRC’s checkered history with the UN, this appears to be a sincere attempt by Hu to avoid a military conflict. USAF Electronic Intelligence reporting indicates the 96th Missile Regiment near Nanping is calibrating their equipment in preparation for a CSS-6 missile launch. Although the exact impact area(s) for the possible missile launch remain unidentified, analysts assess it will be “very close” to Taiwan. The PLA has issued tentative mobilization orders to several air and ground units in the PRC. The orders are believed to be in preparation for deployment into the Nanjing Military District, which is located directly across from Taiwan. 25 DAYS PRIOR TO THE ELECTION As tensions between the PRC and Taiwan continue to rise, sources within the White House are expressing dismay over events in Taiwan.During a televised press conference, President Obama cautioned Shu Chin-Chiang to accept the “status quo” by not (unnecessarily) increasing tensions in a politically charged environment. US representatives from the American Institute in Taiwan have also conveyed “serious concern” over the rhetoric being used by Shu Chin-Chiang. US representatives warned both presidential candidates that under the current circumstances, the US could not guarantee political, or let alone military support, should a confrontation with the PRC occur. Said one high ranking US official “should Shu claim independence, there is no way the US President will send US forces near Taiwan.” Amid rising tensions, the United Nations Security Council agreed to immediately address the brewing crisis. 20 DAYS PRIOR TO THE ELECTION Having essentially been warned by the international community, Shu Chin-Chiang’s next step remains uncertain. With the polls showing Shu holding a 13.84% lead over Ma Ying Jeon, the PRC continues to mobilize their military forces. Imagery of Zhangzhou and Whenzhou naval ports revealed several amphibious assault squadrons were in the early stages of uploading supplies. The US Pacific Command reports Fighter Regiment patrols within the Taiwan Straits have increased by 50%. Xinhua has announced the PRC will be conducting a series of missile tests within the Taiwan Strait. Xinhua’s reports have been verified by USAF reconnaissance flights, which confirmed missile and radar calibrations were being conducted by the 96th Missile Regiment. PLA B-6 bombers from Luqiao airfield were also imaged uploading air-to-surface munitions.

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